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I have an algorithm written in Java that I would like to make more efficient. A part that I think could be made more efficient is finding the smallest of 3 numbers. Currently I'm using the Math.min method as below:

double smallest = Math.min(a, Math.min(b, c));

How efficient is this? Would it be more efficient to replace with if statements like below:

double smallest;
if(a<b && a<c){
    smallest = a;
}else if(b<c && b<a){
    smallest = b;
}else{
    smallest = c;
}

Or if any other way is more efficient

I'm wondering if it is worth changing what I'm currently using?

Any speed increase would be greatly helpful

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8  
Expecting to get any kind of meaningful performance impact from basic numeric comparisons is jumping too far down the rabbit hole. –  debracey Mar 6 '12 at 1:21
1  
@debracey is it when my algorithm has been running for almost 23 hours so far? :P –  Chris Mar 6 '12 at 1:24
3  
Yeah, this is pointless optimization. The cost of this kind of operation is infinitesimal. That being said, I would probably stick with your Math.min construction. –  cjm Mar 6 '12 at 1:24
2  
Math.pow uses a for loop. so say you did math.pow(4,3), you would be saying {double result = 4;for (int i = 0; i < 3 - 1; i++) {result *= 4;}return result;}. This creates a double variable which might not be necessary and the for loop slows it down. –  Stas Jaro Mar 6 '12 at 1:30
3  
HotSpot will inline your calls to Math.min() if they get hot enough, but for completeness it should be mentioned that in your suggested code <= would be more efficient than < as it will save some redundant comparisons and jumps. –  EJP Mar 6 '12 at 1:32

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, it's seriously not worth changing. The sort of improvements you're going to get when fiddling with micro-optimisations like this will not be worth it. Even the method call cost will be removed if the min function is called enough.

If you have a problem with your algorithm, your best bet is to look into macro-optimisations ("big picture" stuff like algorithm selection or tuning) - you'll generally get much better performance improvements there.

And your comment that removing Math.pow gave improvements may well be correct but that's because it's a relatively expensive operation. Math.min will not even be close to that in terms of cost.

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Thanks very helpful. I'm experimenting with different optimisations but I also need to collect results for this base case to be able to compare :( –  Chris Mar 6 '12 at 1:41
    
When you have to call a three way min on hundreds of thousands of times, it adds up –  Michael Mar 30 '12 at 5:37
    
@Michael, nothing in the question seems to indicate that you'd be doing this hundreds of thousands of times. If you were, I wouldn't be using min or doing it three numbers at a time - I'd run through the list of hundreds of thousands of numbers once to get the minimum. And, as I said, if you do call it that often, the JIT compiler will almost certainly compile/inline it. That also appears to be the consensus view, given all the other answers as well. –  paxdiablo Mar 30 '12 at 5:54
double smallest = a;
if (smallest > b) smallest = b;
if (smallest > c) smallest = c;

Not necessarily faster than your code.

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For a lot of utility-type methods, the apache commons libraries have solid implementations that you can either leverage or get additional insight from. In this case, there is a method for finding the smallest of three doubles available in org.apache.commons.lang.math.NumberUtils. Their implementation is actually nearly identical to your initial thought:

public static double min(double a, double b, double c) {
    return Math.min(Math.min(a, b), c);
}
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It all looks ok, your code will be fine, unless you're doing this in a tight loop. I also would consider

double min;
min = (a<b) ? a : b;
min = (min<c) ? min : c;
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The performance of this is irrelevant in theory and in practice, really.

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You can use ternary operator as follows:

smallest=(a>b)?((a>c)?a:c):((b>c)?b:c);

Which takes only one assignment and minimum two comparisons.

But I think that these statements would not have any effect on execution time, your initial logic will take same time as of mine and all of others.

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I would use min/max (and not worry otherwise) ... however, here is another "long hand" approach which may or may not be easier for some people to understand. (I would not expect it to be faster or slower than the code in the post.)

int smallest;
if (a < b) {
  if (a > c) {
    smallest = c;
  } else { // a <= c
    smallest = a;
  }
} else { // a >= b
  if (b > c) {
    smallest = c;
  } else { // b <= c
    smallest = b;
  }
}

Just throwing it into the mix.

Note that this is just the side-effecting variant of Abhishek's answer.

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Math.min uses a simple comparison to do its thing. The only advantage to not using Math.min is to save the extra function calls, but that is a negligible saving.

If you have more than just three numbers, having a minimum method for any number of doubles might be valuable and would look something like:

public static double min(double ... numbers) {
    double min = numbers[0];
    for (int i=1 ; i<numbers.length ; i++) {
        min = (min <= numbers[i]) ? min : numbers[i];
    }
    return min;
}

For three numbers this is the functional equivalent of Math.min(a, Math.min(b, c)); but you save one method invocation.

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double smallest;
if(a<b && a<c){
    smallest = a;
}else if(b<c && b<a){
    smallest = b;
}else{
    smallest = c;
}

can be improved to:

double smallest;
if(a<b && a<c){
smallest = a;
}else if(b<c){
    smallest = b;
}else{
    smallest = c;
}
share|improve this answer

Write a method minimum3 that returns the smallest of three floating-point numbers. Use the Math.min method to implement minimum3. Incorporate the method into an application that reads three values from the user, determines the smallest value and displays the result.

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The question was which is more efficient among the two ways presented (and he knows how to do them) or if there is another way better than the two presented, not how to do it. this is a comment more than an answer. –  user1406062 Oct 5 '12 at 11:59

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