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I have read the SSL TUNNELING INTERNET-DRAFT of December 1995 and set up an HTTP transparent proxy that works perfectly with unencrypted traffic.

Having read the above, as well as googled my brains out, the accepted method to create a tunnel for secure traffic through a proxy seems to be:

connect to the requested host, then have the proxy send an "HTTP 200..." confirmation message back to the client, then from that point on simply pass all further data traffic between client and server.

When I try this, however, the client (Chrome browser) responds to the "HTTP 200..." message with three wingdings characters which I forward to the remote host. At this point there is no response back and the connection fails.

Here is the code I am using for this, after having connected to the host:

if((*request=='C')&&(*(request+1)=='O')&&(*(request+2)=='N')&&(*(request+3)=='N'))
{

    int recvLen;

    send(output,htok,strlen(htok),0); //htok looks like "HTTP/1.0 200 Connection Established\nProxy-Agent: this_proxy\r\n\r\n"

    std::memset(buff,0,bSize);
    int total;
        int bytes;
        int n;
        char cdata[MAXDATA];
        while ((recvLen = recv(output, buff, bSize-1,0)) > 0) //recving from client - here we get wingdings
        {
            memset(cdata,0, MAXDATA);
            strcat(cdata, buff);
            while(recvLen>=bSize-1)//just in case buff is too small
            {
                std::memset(buff,0,bSize);
                recvLen=recv(output,buff,bSize-1,0);
                strcat(cdata, buff);
            }

            total = 0;
            bytes = strlen(cdata);                      
            cout << cdata << endl;//how I see the wingdings
            while (total < strlen(cdata))
            {       
                n = send(requestSock, cdata + total, bytes,0);//forwarding to remote host
                if(n == SOCKET_ERROR)
                {
                    cout << "secure sending error" << endl;
                    break;
                }
                total += n;
                bytes -= n;
            }

            std::memset(buff,0,bSize);
            recvLen=recv(requestSock, buff, bSize,0);//get reply from remote host
            if (recvLen > 0)
            {
                do
                {
                    cout<<"Thread "<<threadid<<" [Connection:Secure]: "<<recvLen<<endl;


                    send(output, buff, recvLen,0);//forward all to client

                    recvLen= recv(requestSock, buff, bSize,0);

                    if(0==recvLen || SOCKET_ERROR==recvLen)         
                    {
                        cout<<"finished secure receiving or socket error"<<endl;
                        break;
                    }

                }while(true);
            }
                      }//end while, loop checks again for client data

Can anyone spot the error of my ways?

share|improve this question
    
send() call can send less than recvLen, and you ignore this fact. Another issue is treating binary data in SSL as text (your code could work for textual HTTP requests but would fail with binary data anyway). – Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Mar 6 '12 at 7:02
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code is much more complicated than necessary. Just read into a char array, save the length returned, and write that many bytes from the same array, in a loop until recv() returns zero. 4 lines of code including two for the braces. Don't try to assemble the entire incoming message, just relay whatever comes in as it comes. Otherwise you are just adding latency, and programming errors. Get rid of all the strXXX() calls altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
Originally I was doing that but then wanted to see what kind of data was coming from the client when nothing was happening. A client 'hello' should consist of more than 3 wingding chars... – Philip Langford Mar 6 '12 at 2:53
    
@PhilipLangford Treating binary data as ASCII isn't going to tell you anything useful. Similarly, calling them 'wingdings' is futile. What is the actual value of the bytes? – EJP Mar 6 '12 at 3:02
    
I took your advice and simplified the transfer and can now see bytes exchanging, however, my logic causes an infinite loop with the remote host never fulfilling its request. Psuedo code: 'while(recv from client>0) { send to host; while(recv from host>0) send to client; } – Philip Langford Mar 6 '12 at 18:06
1  
recv() and send() return 0 if the connection has been disconnected. You need to check both of them for return values < 1 so you can break your loop. You also should not be running 2 separate loops. Use a single loop that calls select() with both sockets to determine when either connection can be read from. When one of the connections is readable, use ioctlsocket() to determine how many bytes are available, recv() just that many bytes, send() the bytes to the other connection, and return to select(). This way, both connections can send data to each other at the same time. – Remy Lebeau Mar 6 '12 at 21:11
1  
Exactly. There is a further subtlety which I was leaving until now. When you get the zero from recv(), shutdown the output on the other socket of the pair (i.e. transmit the EOS), and close both sockets if and only if you have already shutdown the output of the socket you got the zero recv() from. Otherwise you are in danger of closing prematurely: consider that the incoming close might only have been a shutdown itself, and there may still be data flowing the other way. – EJP Mar 7 '12 at 22:48

I don't think you should make the assumption that the traffic does not contain ASCII NUL characters:

            strcat(cdata, buff);
        }

        total = 0;
        bytes = strlen(cdata);

If there are ASCII NULs in the stream, these will fail.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point. I did this over using std::string to save a few cycles, but the network ops probably nullify the effect of that. – Philip Langford Mar 6 '12 at 2:47
    
std::string would also handle 0x00 bytes poorly. Binary data is binary and can't be handled using string classes. EJP's answer suggests a better approach than I did -- don't try to interpret the data at all. – sarnold Mar 6 '12 at 8:45

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