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I'm aware that the following command can be used to recursively replace all instances of a particular string with another:

find /path/to/files -type f -print0 | xargs -0 sed -i 's/oldstring/newstring/g'

However, I need to do this only for lines that start with a particular string ("matchstr").

For example, if a file contained the following lines:

This line containing oldstring should remain untouched
matchstr sometext oldstring somethingelse

I want to have this as output:

This line containing oldstring should remain untouched
matchstr sometext newstring somethingelse

Any suggestions as to how I could proceed would be appreciated.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could do:

sed -i '/^matchstr/{s/oldstring/newstring/g}'

ie

find /path/to/files -type f -print0 | \
  xargs -0 sed -i '/^matchstr/{s/oldstring/newstring/g}'

The first /^matchstr/ looks for lines matching that regex, and for those lines the s/old/new/g is performed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help :) – prynhart Mar 6 '12 at 3:01
    
Actually neither brackets nor whitespace is necessary — you can just use sed -i '/^matchstr/s/oldstring/newstring/g'. – werkritter Jul 8 '15 at 19:38

You can do this easily using sed:

sed -e '/^matchstr/ s/oldstring/newstring/g' inputfile

/^matchstr/ acts as a condition; it makes it execute the following block only if the regex matches. In this case we're looking for matchstr at the beginning of the line.

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Thank you for your help :) – prynhart Mar 6 '12 at 3:01

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