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I'm currently working with a database that has two indexes for a specific table. The index I want has two columns "Name" (varchar2) and "Time" (number). When I write the query

SELECT SOMETHING
  FROM MYTABLE
 WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
   AND TIME BETWEEN STARTVALUE AND ENDVALUE

(where STARTVALUE and ENDVALUE are numbers) it does not use the index. However if I use the following query instead

SELECT SOMETHING
  FROM MYTABLE
 WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
   AND TIME BETWEEN MY_FUNC('STARTQUAL') AND MY_FUNC('ENDQUAL')

it does.

The only difference I can think of is that MY_FUNC explicitly returns a value of type NUMBER - is it possible that the query optimizer is confused about the data type for STARTVALUE and ENDVALUE specified explicitly and is refusing to use the index (I saw some similar threads that mentioned a type conflict was the cause).

Note:

  1. The value being returned by MY_FUNC is EXACTLY the same value that I am specifying in the first query.

  2. The index in question is UNDOUBTEDLY (absolutely no question) the correct index to be using and execution times are orders of magnitude faster when it does.

  3. I have even specified a query hint with the first query and it refuses to use the index.

I know there must be something silly / simple that I'm overlooking but I just can't see it.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

share|improve this question
    
Few questions to begin: What is the Oracle DB version? Have you tried and TIME <= STARTQUAL and TIME >= ENDQUAL ? Can you print the EXPLAIN PLAN? –  Guru Mar 6 '12 at 2:49
    
Try adding to_number(STARTQUAL) in BETWEEN. Can you also paste MY_FUNC definition? –  Guru Mar 6 '12 at 2:51
    
Wow, thanks for the quick response... I have tried using < and >= for the query rather than BETWEEN - no difference. The key to the explain plan is that it is doing a SKIP SCAN rather than a RANGE SCAN. –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 3:06
    
to_number(STARTQUAL) won't work since it is a text string but I had tried to_number(STARTVALUE) and it still did not work. –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 3:06
    
What's really odd is that I created a function called to_value which I pass in a numeric and return a numeric - basically it just says return INVALUE; and when I say Time between TO_VALUE(STARTVALUE) and TO_VALUE(ENDVALUE) it uses the correct index. I could use this as a workaround but it seems soooo unnecessary. –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 3:08

2 Answers 2

Alternatively, Oracle could be optimizing the queries differently based on whether the query involves literal values or bound values.

SELECT SOMETHING
  FROM MYTABLE
 WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
   AND TIME BETWEEN 7 AND 41;

I'll bet Oracle knows something about the distribution of data in the TIME column, and is making a guess - perhaps using outdated statistics - as to what percentage of rows and blocks (i.e. the selectivity) of that column is. Check to see if there's a histogram on that column.

However, a query like this:

SELECT SOMETHING
  FROM MYTABLE
 WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
   AND TIME BETWEEN MY_FUNC('7') AND MY_FUNC('41');

is likely to be optimized as semantically equivalent to:

SELECT SOMETHING
  FROM MYTABLE
 WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
   AND TIME BETWEEN :some_bind AND :some_other_bind;

Because Oracle doesn't know what MY_FUNC('7') does - or even that MY_FUNC('7') will always return the same value of 7 - unless you've told Oracle the function's deterministic. So my experience is that Oracle takes a stab in the dark, for the most part, and tends to prefer an index with a high clustering factor. It seems to guess that even if the index isn't the best choice, at least it minimizes the downside risk by visiting as few data blocks as possible.

My recommendation is to find out for yourself why it's behaving differently - take a 10053 trace of each query:

alter session set events = '10053 trace name context forever;
run sql
alter session set events = '10053 trace name context off;
share|improve this answer
    
That's the type of logic I was getting to but I don't know enough about Oracle at that level to explain it. I'll take a look at the trace and statistics to see if it sheds any light. Thanks! –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 13:29
    
Adam, I've looked into the whole alter session trace mechanism and it looks very interesting. I tried executing it but it doesn't appear to be creating .trc files. I know this is probably a little more involved but if there are any pointers that you can recommend to get the trace to appear I would appreciate it - otherwise, I'll keep digging. Thanks again. –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 22:12
    
The trace files are created in the directory identified by the initialization parameter USER_DUMP_DEST on the database server. They're not created on the client. –  Adam Musch Mar 7 '12 at 14:44
SELECT SOMETHING
FROM MYTABLE
WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
AND TIME BETWEEN STARTVALUE AND ENDVALUE

Here, you have TIME which is a NUMBER, and STARTVALUE and ENDVALUE which are strings (according to your comment). Therefore, an implicit conversion is done - i.e. your query is effectively:

SELECT SOMETHING
FROM MYTABLE
WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
AND TO_CHAR(TIME) BETWEEN STARTVALUE AND ENDVALUE

Unless you have a function-based index on TO_CHAR(TIME), it won't use an index.

Therefore, you must tell Oracle that you always expect the string parameters to be convertable to numbers, i.e.:

SELECT SOMETHING
FROM MYTABLE
WHERE NAME = 'SOME-NAME'
AND TIME BETWEEN TO_NUMBER(STARTVALUE) AND TO_NUMBER(ENDVALUE)

(It's always good practice to avoid implicit conversions, especially in queries, anyway)

share|improve this answer
    
STARTVALUE and ENDVALUE are NOT strings - I specifically said that they are NUMBERS. STARTQUAL and ENDQUAL are strings, they are values passed into a function that effectively derives the same value as I am now trying to provide directly (that was the old way of specifying the range which has been replaced by code in the application that now generates these values directly). Thanks anyway... –  user1251193 Mar 6 '12 at 13:30
    
Sorry user1251193, I don't know your level of expertise. I've come across people who say "this is a number", when they actually mean "this string contains a representation of a numeric value". Anyway, your comment mentioned TO_NUMBER(STARTVALUE), which only makes sense if STARTVALUE is a string. –  Jeffrey Kemp Mar 8 '12 at 12:47

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