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I have a resource, producing JSON, which returns links to a few child resources (which also produce JSON). This resource can be included from a few different points in the tree, so both use the absolutePathBuilder to create links to child resources.

public class AResource {
    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON + ";charset=utf8")
    public Map<String, Object> getRoot(@Context final UriInfo info) {
        final Map<String, Object> toReturn = new HashMap<String, Object>();
        final String[] children = { "one", "two", "thrée" };
        final UriBuilder builder = info.getAbsolutePathBuilder().path("{child}");
        for (final String child : children) {
            toReturn.put(child, builder.build(child).toASCIIString());
        }
        return toReturn;
    }

    @Path("{child:(one|two|thrée)}")
    public ChildResource getChild(@PathParam("child") final String child) {
        return new ChildResource("AResource " + child);
    }
}
public class ChildResource {
    public Map<String, Object> getRoot(@Context final UriInfo info) {
        ...
    }
}

Now lets say I need to add another MediaType, QueryParam, etc. which would cause the Parent resource to return the existing JSON, with the return of each of the child resources within it.

Is there a way in JAX-RS or Jersey to easily create/inject an altered context into a sub-resource? Or to make a sub-request within the container?

I currently am working with a naïve solution, where I take the map from the child, then post-process it to update any URI rooted at the current path, but it feels like there ought to be a better solution (which wouldn't require re-hashing the map after the fact?)

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1 Answer 1

Not that I know. At least, not the way your current method is setup.

Here's a way to get that sort of functionality, but would require architecting your code differently...

1) Use the Response and ResponseBuilder classes to wrap your entities. Not only will it allow you to provide customize the response status, but you can also allow one method to respond to QueryParams and adjust the entity you deliver, which leads into...

2) If you need to deliver multiple versions of your entities then create Facades for them. Basically just create classes that contain the structure of what you would like your JSON responses to look like. In your case, one would represent child resources as URL strings, while another would simply contain the child objects.

public class ParentResource{
  @GET
  @Produces("application/json")
  public Response getParent(
    @Context UriInfo uriInfo
    , @DefaultValue("false") @QueryParam("cascade") Boolean cascade 
  ) {
    if(cascade)
      //This assumes that your ParentEntity stores the child objects already.
      return Response.ok().entity(new ParentEntity).build();
    else
      return Response.ok().entity(new ParentFacadeWithURLS(uriInfo)).build();
  }
}

EDIT #1 2012.03.07

public class AResource {
    @GET
    @Produces("application/json")
    public Map<String, Object> getRoot(
      @Context final UriInfo info
      , @DefaultValue("false") @QueryParam("cascade") Boolean cascade
    ) {
      final Map<String, Object> toReturn = new HashMap<String, Object>();
      final String[] children = { "one", "two", "thrée" };
      if(cascade){
        ChildResource cr= new ChildResource();
        toReturn.put(child, cr.getRoot(uriInfo));
      } else {
        final UriBuilder builder = info.getAbsolutePathBuilder().path("{child}");
        for (final String child : children) {
            toReturn.put(child, builder.build(child).toASCIIString());
        }
      }
      return toReturn;
    }

    @GET
    @Path("{child:(one|two|thrée)}")
    public ChildResource getChild(@PathParam("child") final String child) {
        ChildResource cr = new ChildResource();
        return new cr.getRoot(child);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Point 1 is completely unrelated to the question. Response/Response Builder has nothing to do with context of parent/child. Yes your type signature is pretty, but I could have a type signature of Object and return any Response, Map, Facade, Resource I wish and Jersey wouldn't care so long as it could interpret the result. –  Charlie Mar 7 '12 at 14:04
    
Point 2 was something I considered, but it feels like it violates the DRY principle. I would have a Parent entity object, a Child entity object, and a ParentWithChildren entity object... Each of which requiring its own custom MessageBodyWriter (instead of the Map<String,Object> I have). Now every time the child representation changes, the ParentWithChildren representation must change, and the corresponding MessageBodyWriters also have to change. –  Charlie Mar 7 '12 at 14:13
    
Hi Charlie, I include point 1 not because of a pretty type signature, but because it allows you to use one method/URL path to serve different object responses, since you are encapsulating your entity within the Response Object. For my 2nd point, you're not creating separate entities, instead just facade or masks for those entities when the full cascaded version is not needed. If the underlying entity changes, yes, you would need to update the facade/mask class, but this should be any more work than updating separate methods if you kept all the logic in the entity. –  hypno7oad Mar 7 '12 at 14:51
    
Let me reiterate: **Point 1 is irrelevant to this question.** When the only HTTP statii from my method are 200/404: public Response method() { return Response.ok().entity(myObject).build(); } is more verbose and accomplishes the same task as public Object method() { return myObject; } In both cases I can return different types of objects, provided I have the appropriate MessageBodyWriters. –  Charlie Mar 7 '12 at 15:27
    
With your second point, I think I was unclear, but these are both subresources. The child can be a child of any number of parents who would want to include the child's serialized body within their response. Creating, and maintaining a Facade class for every ParentXChild becomes extremely redundant. –  Charlie Mar 7 '12 at 15:30

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