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I am trying to write a simple news feed aggregator.

I am using http://code.google.com/p/feedparser/, and I get standard Python 9-tuple time format like (2004, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0) for each post, http://packages.python.org/feedparser/date-parsing.html

How do I compare this time format?

If I want to know if an article in the feed is new or not, is comparing the time the only way?

Thanks a lot!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Comparing time is probably the best way, unless you want to keep every article you've ever seen around to filter the full feed against.

The actual comparison of the 9-tuples is quite easy: Python's default tuple ordering compares elements item-wise:

>>> (2004, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0) > (2004, 1, 1, 19, 48, 10, 3, 1, 0)
True
>>> (2004, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0) > (2005, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0)
False

Which turns out to be exactly what you need.

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The time tuples can be compared directly with d1 < d2 or d1 == d2. The fields are compared lexicographically (i.e. the first field is compared, if it is equal, then the next is compared, etc).

If you want to limit the comparison detail, use slicing to chop-off the fields you don't need:

d1[:3] == d2[:3]       # compare just the year/month/day fields
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Like this?

>>> date1 = (2004, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0)
>>> date2 = (2012, 1, 1, 19, 48, 21, 3, 1, 0)
>>> date1[0] == date2[0]
False
>>> date1[0] == 2004
True
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Thanks! But I dont think so. It is supposed to be compared in a simpler way. –  Susan Mayer Mar 6 '12 at 3:53
2  
@Susan, you can also compare using < and > to check if one date is earlier/later than another –  gnibbler Mar 6 '12 at 3:57

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