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In the shared buffer memory problem , why is it that we can have at most (n-1) items in the buffer at the same time.

Where 'n' is the buffer's size .

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

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Well, theoretically a bounded buffer can hold elements upto its size. But what you are saying could be related to certain implementation quirks like a clean way of figuring out when the buffer is empty/full. This question -> Empty element in array-based bounded buffer deals with a similar thing. See if it helps.

However you can of course have implementations that have all n slots filled up. That's how the bounded buffer problem is defined anyway.

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In an OS development class in college, I had an adjunct teacher that claimed it was impossible to have a software-only solution that could use all N elements in the buffer. I proved him wrong with something I decided to call the race track solution (inspired by the fact that I like to run track).

On a race track, you are not limited to a 400 meter race; a race can consist of more than one lap. What happens if two runners are neck and neck in a race? How do you know whether they are tied, or whether one runner has lapped the other? The answer is simple: in a race, we don't monitor a runner's position on the track; we monitor the distance each runner has traversed. Thus, when two runners are neck and neck, we can disambiguafy between a tie and when one runner has lapped the other.

So, our algorithm has an N-element array, and manages a 2N race. We don't restart the producer/consumer's counter back to zero until they finish their respective 2N race. We don't allow the producer to be more than one lap ahead of the consumer, and we don't allow the consumer to be ahead of the producer. Actually, we only have to monitor the distance between the producer and consumer.

The code is as follows:

Item track[LAP];
int consIdx = 0;
int prodIdx = 0;

void consumer()
{ while(true)
  { int diff = abs(prodIdx - consIdx);
    if(0 < diff) //If the consumer isn't tied
    { track[consIdx%LAP] = null;
      consIdx = (consIdx + 1) % (2*LAP);
    }
  }
}

void producer()
{ while(true)
  { int diff = (prodIdx - consIdx);
    if(diff < LAP) //If prod hasn't lapped cons
    { track[prodIdx%LAP] = Item();      //Advance on the 1-lap track.
      prodIdx = (prodIdx + 1) % (2*LAP);//Advance in the 2-lap race.
    }
  }
}

It's been a while since I originally solved the problem, so this is according to my best recollection. Hopefully I didn't overlook any bugs. Hope this helps!

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Oops, here's a bug fix:

Item track[LAP];
int consIdx = 0;
int prodIdx = 0;

void consumer()
{ while(true)
  { int diff = prodIdx - consIdx;         //When prodIdx wraps to 0 before consIdx,
    diff = 0<=diff? diff: diff + (2*LAP); //think in 3 Laps until consIdx wraps to 0.
    if(0 < diff) //If the consumer isn't tied
    { track[consIdx%LAP] = null;
      consIdx = (consIdx + 1) % (2*LAP);
    }
  }
}

void producer()
{ while(true)
  { int diff = prodIdx - consIdx;
    diff = 0<=diff? diff: diff + (2*LAP);
    if(diff < LAP) //If prod hasn't lapped cons
    { track[prodIdx%LAP] = Item();      //Advance on the 1-lap track.
      prodIdx = (prodIdx + 1) % (2*LAP);//Advance in the 2-lap race.
    }
  }
}
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