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In below example

    private Integer a = 10;
    private Integer c = -10;
    private int b = -10;

    public void acquire(){
        synchronized(a){
            print("acquire()");
            try{                    
                b = -12;
                //Thread.sleep(5000);
                a.wait(5000);
                print("acquire : "+b);
                print("I have awoken");
            }catch(Exception e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        print("Leaving acquire()");
    }


    public void modify(int n){
        print("Entered in modfy");
        synchronized(a){
            try{                    
                b = -15;
                //a.wait(5000);
                Thread.sleep(5000);
                print("modfy : "+b);
            }catch(Exception e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

Thread A is calling acquire(), Thread B is calling modify().

Value of b changed by one thread is visible to another thread.

  1. Thread A: b=-12; and waits
  2. Thread B: b=-15; prints b; exit
  3. Thread A: prints new value of b ie -15.

How can i simulate need of volatile with above example then use of volatile in above example.

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Is this homework dude? –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 4:52
    
Previous questions in this thread are: stackoverflow.com/questions/9571982/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/9577913/where-to-call-wait –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 4:52
2  
You are not guaranteed to be hit by a car, even if you cross the street without looking both ways. There is no method that is guaranteed to fail, the rules don't work that way. (Just as there is no way to cross the street without looking that guarantees you'll get hit by a car.) –  David Schwartz Mar 6 '12 at 5:00
    
@Gray, not a homework. Just trying to clear all concept of multithreading in single day. –  articlestack Mar 6 '12 at 5:04
    
@articlestack I would suggest even with ten years multi-threaded programming experience you will still be learning. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 6 '12 at 8:48
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have an example here

http://vanillajava.blogspot.com/2012/01/demonstrating-when-volatile-is-required.html

The problems you are likely to find are;

  • While volatile provides some memory consistency guarantees, not using volatile doesn't guarantee you will see a problem.
  • The problem doesn't appear to happen in the Sun/Oracle/OpenJDK JVM until the code has been optimised i.e. after it has been run 10,000 times.
  • There is a usually a subtle race condition involved and changing even minor things may mean you don't see a problem.
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If you simply want to simulate the need of volatile simply do this:

volatile int x = 10;
public void acquire()
{
     x = 15;   
     print("acquire()");
}

public void modify(int n)
{
     print("Entered in modfy");
     x = -15;
}

//Let threadA call acquire() and threadB call modify()Then print x and see (there should not be any race conditions)

If you want to make it more fun, add a few more threads and methods and try to access x

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If its so simple perhaps you can provide a complete example. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 6 '12 at 8:47
    
@PeterLawrey: I sense sarcasm here :). I used volatile while writing multi-threaded Java program with sockets. I would have a common token (volatile int array) which multiple threads update. I thought this might be on the same lines. If its not, please elaborate. –  noMAD Mar 6 '12 at 18:12
    
I suspects its not as simple to demonstrate as you suggest, but I am happy to be proven wrong. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 6 '12 at 20:27
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Accoding to "Concurrency in Practice - Book", volatile should be used only for flags kind of variables.(which are booleans). Volatile should be used where the new state does not depend on old state of variable ..

volatile boolean flag = true;

while(flag) { ..//do something;

}

when the flag variable can be modified by other threads, the original thread will be notified because the flag is tagged volatile. Otherwise, the loop may go forever.

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