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I was wondering what would be the best way to execute a java-script code only on specific pages.

Let's imagine we have a template-based web-site, rewrite rule for the content ist set, jquery available and it basically looks like this:

  <!DOCTYPE html>
  <html>
   <head>
    <script src="script.js"></script>
   </head>
   <body>
    ...
    include $content;
    ..
   </body>
</html>

content 'info' contains a button, we want something to happen on click, content 'alert' should give as a message, when you hover a text field.

What is the best way to trigger these action, without running into an error, because the object is not found?

Option one: using window.location.pathname

 $(document).ready(function() {
      if (window.location.pathname == '/info.php') {
          $("#button1").click(function(){'
            //do something
          })
      }else if(window.location.pathname == '/alert.php'){
           $("#mytextfield").hover(){
             alert('message');
           }
    }

Option two: checking if elements exists

$(document).ready(function() {
  if ($("#button1").length > 0) {
      $("#button1").click(function(){'
        //do something
      })
  }else if ($("#mytextfield").length > 0){
       $("#mytextfield").hover(){
         alert('message');
       }
}

Option three: include the script in the loaded template

//stands for itself

Is their a better solution? Or do I have to get along with one of these solutions?

Your experience, usage or any links related to this topic are appreciated.

//EDIT:

I might have choosen a bad example, the actual code would be somethin like:

    mCanvas = $("#jsonCanvas");
    mMyPicture = new myPicture (mCanvas);

where the myPicture constructor get's the context of the canvas element, and throws an error, if mCanvas is undefined.

share|improve this question
1  
A good idea would be to only include javascript on the pages that require it and $(document).ready may be called more than once on a page, so you should be safe here. –  Ian Bishop Mar 6 '12 at 5:30
    
You don't need to check if the element exists before assigning event handlers if you're using jQuery: $("someselector").click(...) will apply the click handler to the zero or more elements that matched "someselector" - it doesn't give an error if none matched. –  nnnnnn Mar 6 '12 at 5:31
    
@IanBishop : That's option three :) - >load js with template @ nnnnnn : See my edit, but you're right, concerning 'only' click actions –  Johannes Staehlin Mar 6 '12 at 5:38
1  
Consider for instance, you have 3 of these 'conditional' includes. Page A uses 1,2. Page B uses 1. Page C uses only 3. Option 1 leaves you with a mess of conditionals check which page you're on and which functions to call. Option 2 leaves you with a different mess of conditionals to check what scripts should be run. Further, if you have conflict in ids - you're in trouble. If you have say, an additional verification for submitting a form - you could have two buttons with the id 'submit'. But only one of them requires the additional verification. –  Ian Bishop Mar 6 '12 at 5:47
1  
Another common approach is add class names to html or body tag. –  charlietfl Mar 6 '12 at 5:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A little different approach than checking the URL path : You can group page specific event handlers in a single function and then in each include, have a domready which will call these functions.

Eg: in script.js you have two functions (outside domready) viz. onPage1Load() and onPage2Load().

While in your page1.php you have a $(document).ready(function(){ onPage1Load(); }) and so on for other pages. This will make sure that unintended event handlers are not registered.

share|improve this answer
    
i think that this is the easiest way to do the things write and it is easy to read and debug. Option one i think is like front controller not bad but can result into a mess.Also when there are aliases that is going to be hard.That may work if there is a framework to automate this somehow... The method with page class seems also good idea. –  Parhs Apr 9 '12 at 17:17

Set a class attribute to your body tag.

<body class="PageType">

And then in your script..

$(function(){
  if($('body').is('.PageType')){
    //add dynamic script tag  using createElement()
    OR
    //call specific functions
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I think it's great practice to add class names to every page.. both for js and for css –  Damon May 11 '12 at 14:57
    
Not a bad idea until someone renames a class –  Neil Mar 19 at 10:11
    
plus one for this approach; using the jQuery'is –  numediaweb Apr 13 at 13:06

I would use the switch statement and a variable. (I'm using jQuery!)

var windowLoc = $(location).attr('pathname'); //jquery format to get window.location.pathname

switch(windowLoc){      
  case "/info.php":
    //code here
    break;
  case "/alert.php":
    //code here
    break;
}

//use windowLoc as necessary elsewhere

This will allow you to change what "button" does based on the page that you're on. If I understood your question correctly; this is what I would do. Also, if I had were serving large amounts of javascript, I would simply add a new JS file completely.

var windowLoc = $(location).attr('pathname'); //jquery format to get window.location.pathname

switch(windowLoc){      
  case "/info.php":
    var infoJS = document.createElement('script');
    infoJS.type = 'text/javascript';
    infoJS.src = 'location/to/my/info_file.js';
    $('body').append(infoJs);
    break;
  case "/alert.php":
    var alertJS = document.createElement('script');
    alertJS.type = 'text/javascript';
    alertJS.src = 'location/to/my/alert_file.js';
    $('body').append(alertJs);
    break;
}

Hope this helps -

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
    
since you are using jquery. jQuery.getScript() useful –  Bamboo Mar 6 '12 at 5:49
    
nice approach to re-load js files. :) –  Johannes Staehlin Mar 6 '12 at 5:55

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