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I have issues setting up my deployment project in Visual Studio 2010. Im using Windows 7 x64. Here's my problem:

The setup is supposed to install my program for all users. During the setup three registry keys are written to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/Something folder, containing the setup variables for Serial, Name and Organization as values - [COMPANYNAME], [PIDKEY], [USERNAME].

What happens:

User1 (Admin) installs the software, entering his username, serial and company. Everything works. The keys can be found and values read by the program, using Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(path). The first thing I don't get is that I cannot find the registry entries, using the regedit.exe. Anyway, the code above finds them.

Now, User2 (Non-admin) tries to execute the freshly installed program. The installer is launched again, saying "Wait for ... to configure ...". The user specific folders for User2 are created correctly. The program is started, but the registry keys cannot be found by the program anymore.

Now, finally, User1 tries opening the program again. (The registry entries cannot be found anymore.) Edit: The registry entries are actually there, but its values are empty.

So, my questions:

  1. Why can't I see the registry entries with regedit after the install, although they are obviously there?

(2. Why are the registry entries deleted, when the second user tries launching the program for the first time and how can I avoid that?)

Edit: 2. Why are the registry values set to empty strings, when the second user tries launching the program for the first time and how can I avoid that?

Cheers from Auckland and thanks!

Marc

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. You might be missing the registry entries if you have a 32 bit package installed on a x64 machine. In this case the registry entries would be redirected under "HKLM\Wow6432Node...". This is the standard behavior for x64 Windows machines. The same happens with the file redirection to Program Files and Program Files(x86).

  2. That is strange. It could happen that the second launch of the installer, a normal automatic repair operation, has removed the registry entries by mistake. To get more details about the actions executed during the second launch I recommend you enable permanent logging on the OS. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223300

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1. Perfect, I would have never that one... Wonder why the Find-function didn't find the keys though? Anyway, they are there. The registry keys are still there after User2 launched the program, but the values are overwritten with empty values. So I actually got that wrong in my problem description: The entries are there, but the values are set to "". Obviously the "second installer" performs the entry again, without having values for that. Do you have an idea how to solve that? – Marc Mar 6 '12 at 9:06
    
Note that unless you need 64-bit support, it's probably cleaner to compile your .NET app as an x86 (instead of an "Any" app) rather than to hardcode the Wow6432Node subkey. – Michael Urman Mar 6 '12 at 12:39

Wonder why the Find-function didn't find the keys though?

Probably the API used is considering the keys do not exist if all the values are empty. You should check its docs.

Obviously the "second installer" performs the entry again, without having values for that. Do you have an idea how to solve that?

This usually happens if the registry are written with values from public properties. During the automatic repair the properties don't have their initial install values so they are considered to contain an empty string, which is than used to replace the registry values.

The only solution you have is to make a small custom action that runs during repair, as immediate, which searches the registry entries before they get overwritten and places their values in the properties your are using. This way the overwrite operation will use the correct values.

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