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I want to pick a random number and express that number in the format of a lottery system. For example, a lottery system has 7 groups of 2-digit numbers from 01 to 40 with the total possible combinations of 163,840,000,000 (40 to the 7th power). If I pick a random base-10 number, say 453,867,221, How can I express that in 7 groups of 2-digit numbers from 01-40?

My programming language of choice is Python, although any language/pseudo language will help.

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1  
A real lottery doesn't allow repeats. You'll need to code for that too. –  John Pick Mar 6 '12 at 6:51
1  
Remember that log2(40^7) is about 37.3, so you need 38 bits to represent the maximum value as an integer. You'll have to be sure to use a long for the binary representation. –  Jim Garrison Mar 6 '12 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So you have 40-base numbers with 7 40-base "digits". Converting them to an integer is relatively simple (I'm using explicit loops to make things clearer):

digits = [12, 5, 39, 1, 40, 8, 17]
total = 0
for digit in digits:
    total = total * 40 + (digit-1)

Converting back is just the reverse:

total = ...
digits = []
while total > 0:
    digits = [(total % 40 + 1)] + digits
    total = total / 40
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2  
You want to subtract 1 from each digit converting to integer, and add 1 when converting from integer. Base 40 has 'digits' 0-39. –  Jim Garrison Mar 6 '12 at 6:48
    
Of course I do... Thanks. –  zmbq Mar 6 '12 at 6:50
1  
Thank you, zmbq and Jim. This does the trick. –  tahoar Mar 6 '12 at 7:11
    
Why not use digits.append() ? –  yak Mar 6 '12 at 8:48
    
Or rather digits.insert(0, total % 40 + 1). Or append() and then reverse in the end. Neither is a big deal though. –  Lennart Regebro Jul 2 '13 at 20:43

The standard library's random.sample chooses n values from a population without replacement:

>>> import random
>>> ' '.join('{:02d}'.format(n) for n in random.sample(xrange(1,41),7))
'25 19 15 09 01 26 06'

But here's exactly what you asked for, including the possibility of repeated numbers:

import random

def display(n):
    for _ in range(7):
        d,n = n % 40 + 1, n // 40
        print '{:02d}'.format(d),
    print

display(0)       # test lower limit
display(40**7-1) # test upper limit
display(random.randint(0,40**7-1))

Result:

01 01 01 01 01 01 01
40 40 40 40 40 40 40
18 23 27 14 23 31 38
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1  
+1 oh, very nice, much better than my crap ! –  wim Mar 6 '12 at 7:06
    
+1 for elegance and non-wheel-reinvention. (also for the use of _ as a don't-care, which I forgot you could do.) –  Li-aung Yip Mar 6 '12 at 7:10

I question the logic of the packing and base-changing obfuscation. What do you hope to achieve with this? Why not model the domain more closely?

Zen of python #2: Explicit is better than implicit.

import this
import random

lottery_digits = range(1, 41)
lottery_size = 7

random_lottery_number = [random.choice(lottery_digits) for _ in xrange(lottery_size)]

If you want to avoid duplicates, then you want to look at using random.sample instead.

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