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public final void sendAdvertisement(final Advertisement advertisment, int delay, final int repetitions){
    final ScheduledFuture exec = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate( //<< initialized on this line
        new Runnable(){
            int totalSends = 0;
            public void run(){
                //do stuff here

                if(++totalSends >= repetitions) exec.cancel(true); //<< here is says exec might not be initialized
            }
        },
    0, delay, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
}

If this isn't possible, could you suggest a better way to do this? I couldn't find a method for it in ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor. basically what I'm trying to do is make this code be run 3 times then cancel the "timer." I could probably use Swing Timer, but I don't want to since its used for other stuff.

It says in the comments, but this is the error:

%PATH%Discovery.java:148: variable exec might not have been initialized
                if(++totalSends >= repetitions) exec.cancel(true);
share|improve this question
    
final ScheduledFeature exec = null; exec = executor.sche... etc. Then within your if(++totalSends) statement, add a secondary statement if(exec != null){exec.cancel(true);} ??? –  Technik Empire Mar 6 '12 at 7:32
    
thats not possible, you can't change a final variable after its initialized, even to null right? –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 7:33
    
Woops you're right. Make it non final. –  Technik Empire Mar 6 '12 at 7:34
    
Nevermind I deleted my answer and I'm wrong. If you make it non-final, then you can't access it within the runnable. My bad. –  Technik Empire Mar 6 '12 at 7:35
1  
it has to be funal though, otherwise I won;t be able to use it in the anonomous inner class –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 7:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

why do you use fixed rate scheduer when you know number of executions, i think simple for loop will do the job

for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
    executor.schedule(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            // do stuff here
        }
    }, delay * i, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
}

As WalterM said : It is not good way to create many new instances, use reference in loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats a nice Idea, but I don't want to create a new Runnable for every iteration. Especially if it might go over 10 or something. Its just too much. –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 10:03
    
Now that I think of it, your actually half right. If you create the Runnable before the loop, and then just pass the same Runnable object through each iteration. You actually don't need a new one. –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 10:07
    
Yes, of course - i targeted the problem of execution not the problem of creating many instances.How do you finally solved the problem? –  user1190541 Mar 6 '12 at 17:31

There are basically two ways I know of to get around this. Unfortunately neither of them is especially nice regarding the resulting code quality, so I'm not sure if I can recommend them.

The first solution would be to make exec a final one-element array. Then you can assign exec[0] = something after declaration even tho the array itself is final. A variation of this is to use/create some reference class (since you can alter attributes of final references, but not the references themselves). The following is a simple example, but keep in mind that it does not take any concurrency issues into consideration (see further down):

    final ScheduledFuture[] exec = new ScheduledFixture[1];
    exec[0] = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate( //<< initialized on this line
            new Runnable(){
                int totalSends = 0;
                public void run(){
                    //do stuff here

                    if(++totalSends >= repetitions) exec[0].cancel(true); //<< here is says exec might not be initialized
                }
            },
        0, delay, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);

Alternatively you could move exec out of the local scope of the method and make it a class attribute instead.

I must however warn you that, especially with the initial delay of zero, there is a real possibility of the code inside the runnable being executed before the scheduleAtFixedRate method returns, in which case exec[0] will still be null. Also, you should use synchronization to ensure that the value of exec[0] as set by the main thread will be available to the thread responsible for executing the runnable.

Both of the above solutions should work, but I don't think that either of them is especially nice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this makes sense. I used the array of size 1 since I want it to just be local to the method. chances are it won't be null since the thread takes a bit to get going, but I understand why it might happen. so I will take that into account. –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 7:57
    
Sorry but I really disagree with this answer. It may solve the compilation problem but there is no guantee that exec[0] is not null and even if it is not null the object may not have been fulling initialized -- even though the Runnable is running. THis is the sort of solution that might work well and then fail spectacularly in production, under different load, or after changing how much work is done in do stuff here. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 13:33
    
This is why I specifically warned about such problems in the second last paragraph. Granted, using AtomicReference as you suggested is definitely much better in every way. I don't know how I have managed to overlook that class for so long. –  Jiddo Mar 6 '12 at 17:55

Sorry but I really disagree with the currently accepted answer.

I understand that it may work from the standpoint of removing the compiler warning but the whole point of the warning is pointing out that you may be accessing a variable that has not been assigned yet. Even if exec or exec[0] is non-null there is also no guarantee that the ScheduledFuture object has even been properly initialized -- yes even though the inner thread may be running. This is very dangerous and might work for a while but then fail dramatically in production, when you move to an architecture with more cores, or under different load circumstances. It also may work but then you change your do stuff here code a month from now and it starts to fail.

I see a couple of ways that you can accomplish this in a better manner. They are more complicated but also more safe and consistent with Java. The first that comes to mind is by using the AtomicReference:

final AtomicReference<ScheduledFuture> futureReference =
    new AtomicReference<ScheduledFuture>();
ScheduledFuture exec = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(
    new Runnable() {
        int totalSends = 0;
        public void run() {
            //do stuff here
            if (++totalSends >= repetitions) {
                // we need to wait for the future to be initialized
                while (futureReference.get() == null) {
                    try {
                        Thread.sleep(1);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        Thread.currentThread.().interrupt();
                    }
                }
                futureReference.get().cancel(true);
            }
        }
    },
    0, delay, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
futureReference.set(exec);
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, its pretty much the same thing though, I did the check if(exec[0]==null); personally, I think they're the same thing. I will never use Thread.sleep(); in a threadpool though. I think its a bad idea. –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 15:51
    
== null is not the same thing dude. The optimizer can return a value from the initializer but choose to do the actual code initialization later. This is the same as the double check locking bug: javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-02-2001/jw-0209-double.html –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 15:55
    
In terms of the sleep, personally I think that spinning is much more dangerous than the sleep. You could do a sleep(1) if you really need to. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 15:56
    
@WalterM Remember that the sleep(1) is only there to solve the race condition issue so should rarely be hit. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 16:37
    
no, checking if its null before using it is fine, i'm not doing if(exec[0]==null)exec[0]=new Blah(); I'm doing if(exec[0]!=null)//use it. so there shouldn't be any problems at all –  WalterM Mar 6 '12 at 17:22

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