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I have the following program going to segfault. I am unable to understand why. Kindly help me.

int main(){
    char *a="String One", *b="String Two";
    while(*a++=*b++);
return 0;
}

To analyse it, I removed the while loop and made it simpler. Still it gives segfault!

int main(){
    char *a="String One", *b="String Two";
    *a++=*b++;
return 0;
}

But this works. I mean no segfault!

int main(){
    char *a="String One", *b="String Two";
    *a++;
    *b++;
return 0;
}

Replying to Luchien:

I was actually trying to emulate strcpy. Something like this. Now that i know that string literal is read only, I could get this working. Thank you all.

main(){
char x[10];
char *xx = x;

char *y = "Hello";

char *t=x, *f=y;

while(*xx++ = *y++);

printf(" %s ...%s \n",t,f);
}
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5  
Undefined behavior to change string literals. c-faq.com/strangeprob/strlitnomod.html –  cnicutar Mar 6 '12 at 7:34
    
Also undefined behavior to write to the same variable twice between two sequence points. –  martiert Mar 6 '12 at 7:46
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7 Answers

With

char *a="String One", *b="String Two";

your a points to readonly memory containing the given string. Modifying this is undefined behaviour.

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Oh. I did not know this is a read only memory. Thanks a lot. –  Pkp Mar 6 '12 at 7:38
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Many operating systems store literal string values in a read-only memory section, which means that attempts to modify the memory lead to the OS telling the program: hey, you can't touch that! On unix systems the OS does this by sending the process the SEGV signal, which usually leads to process termination.

Since C programs run on bare metal embedded systems and on many different operating systems, some of which have this restriction, some of which don't, the C standard declares this undefined behaviour.

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When you create a string constant by saying char *a="String One" 'a' is not an array, but a pointer which is initialized to point to a string constant. If you want to change the string that it points to, you can point it elsewhere, but trying to modify the contents in place results in undefined behavior.

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In the third piece of code, *a++ will access the address pointed to by a, which holds the character 'S', so no segment fault.

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This as i understand is because the starting address of the string literal is stored as a stack variable, while the string literal is in the read only section. If i do *a++ then i am just modifying the local stack variable to point to a different address. So it is working. Is my understanding correct? –  Pkp Mar 6 '12 at 7:57
    
I think you're right, you're just modifying the pointer a. –  PJ.Hades Mar 6 '12 at 8:10
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You're modifying a string literal, which is undefined behavior.

I also find it annoying that

char *a="String One"

is actually

const char *a="String One"

"StringOne" is stored in read-only memory, and can thus not be modified.

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using the assignment in the loop is a C idiom for copying a string, see K&R Chapter 5 –  Cameron Mar 6 '12 at 7:43
3  
The literal may be stored in read-only memory, it's not a requirement, some implementations will actually change the string's contents, although that doesn't stop it being undefined behaviour. –  dreamlax Mar 6 '12 at 7:49
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while(*xx++ = *y++);

Is this really something you want? What do you wish to accomplish? This is actually undefined behavior, as you don't know what xx will be after this. Will you first increment xx, or will you first copy the value from y to xx, and then increment? See http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1256.pdf 6.5.2

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I don't see your point. Postfix ++ has a higher precedence than dereferencing *, so it increments the pointer variable and not its target. And the incrementing happens after using the variable, so the access happens at the old point. –  glglgl Mar 6 '12 at 14:40
    
Yeah got that. I was trying to emulate strcpy, but realised the info you just told. But later was very much involved in the fact why string literal was read only. –  Pkp Mar 7 '12 at 2:59
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Those strings that a, b are stored in data section. That section is read-only area. So you couldn't modify the strings at data section. a and b is just a pointer to point strings at data section. x is stored in stack, so you can modify it.

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