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I have a PDB file. Now it has two parts separated by TER. Before TER I call it part 1. I want to take x,y,z of ATOM 1 of first part i.e before TER and find distance to all x,y,z co ordinates after TER and then second ATOM of part one to all ATOMS of part second. This has to be repeated for all ATOMS of first part= to all ATOMS of second part. I have to automate it for 20 files. names of my files begin like 1_0.pdb,2_0.pdb....20_0.pdb. This is a distance calculation. I have tried something in PERL but its very rough. Can someone help a bit. The File looks like:

----long file (I truncated it)----

ATOM   1279 C    ALA    81      -1.925 -11.270   1.404
ATOM   1280 O    ALA    81      -0.279   9.355  15.557
ATOM   1281 OXT  ALA    81      -2.188  10.341  15.346
TER   
ATOM   1282 N    THR    82      29.632   5.205   5.525
ATOM   1283 H1   THR    82      30.175   4.389   5.768
ATOM   1284 H2   THR    82      28.816   4.910   5.008

The code is: In the end it finds the maximum distance and its co ordinates

my @points = (); 
open(IN, @ARGV[0]) or die "$!"; 
while (my $line = <IN>) { 

  chomp($line); 
  my @array = (split (/\s+/, $line))[5, 6, 7]; 
  print "@array\n"; 
  push @points, [ @array ]; 
} 
close(IN); 


 $max=0;
 for my $i1 ( 0 .. $#points  )

{ 
    my ( $x1, $y1, $z1 ) = @{ $points[$i1] };  
    my $dist = sqrt( ($x1+1.925)**2 + ($y1+11.270)**2 + ($z1-1.404)**2 ); 
    print "distance from (-1.925 -11.270 1.404) to ( $x1, $y1, $z1 ) is $dist\n"; 

    if ( $dist > $max )
     { $max = $dist;
       $x=$x1;
       $y=$y1;
       $z=$z1; 
      }}
    print "maximum value is : $max\n";
print "co ordinates are : $x $y $z\n";        
share|improve this question
1  
Make your for-loop part + resulting print into a subroutine to which you can pass one array ref with part1 values, and the entire array ref for the part2 values. Then you can simply loop through the part1 values and compare. Use a regex inside your initial while loop to separate part1 and part2, e.g. last if /^TER$/. – TLP Mar 6 '12 at 9:15
    
What's the pdb file? – DVK Mar 6 '12 at 12:01
    
its 3vc8..but i am using minimized files of it – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 12:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure I clearly understand what you want, but how about:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;

my (@refer, @points);
my $part = 0;
while (my $line = <DATA>) { 
    chomp($line);
    if ($line =~ /^TER/) {
        $part++;
        next;
    }
    my @array = (split (/\s+/, $line))[5, 6, 7]; 
    if ($part == 0) {
        push @refer, [ @array ]; 
    } else {
        push @points, [ @array ]; 
    }
} 
my %max = (val=>0, x=>0, y=>0, z=>0);
foreach my $ref(@refer) {
    my ($x1, $y1, $z1) = @{$ref};
    foreach my $atom(@points) {
        my ($x, $y, $z) = @{$atom};
        my $dist = sqrt( ($x-$x1)**2 + ($y-$y1)**2 + ($z-$z1)**2 );
        if ($dist > $max{val}) {
            $max{val} = $dist;
            $max{x} = $x;
            $max{y} = $y;
            $max{z} = $z;
        }
    }
}
print "max is $max{val}; coord: x=$max{x}, y=$max{y}, z=$max{z}\n";

__DATA__
ATOM   1279 C    ALA    81      -1.925 -11.270   1.404
ATOM   1280 O    ALA    81      -0.279   9.355  15.557
ATOM   1281 OXT  ALA    81      -2.188  10.341  15.346
TER   
ATOM   1282 N    THR    82      29.632   5.205   5.525
ATOM   1283 H1   THR    82      30.175   4.389   5.768
ATOM   1284 H2   THR    82      28.816   4.910   5.008

output:

max is 35.9813670807545; coord: x=30.175, y=4.389, z=5.768
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help but why doesnot the code run if I give my file. name of my file is 40_0.pdb.i run code as perl code.pl 40_0.pdb – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 12:02
    
@kanika: Just replace <DATA> by <FILE_HANDLER> in the while loop. – Toto Mar 6 '12 at 12:04
    
i did that..there is some error as Use of uninitialized value in subtraction (-) at tlp.pl line 26, <FILE> line 2619. i dont know what that means. – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 13:35
    
@kanika: What is the line 2619 in your input file? Isn't it empty? – Toto Mar 6 '12 at 13:51
    
no its not empty.it is ATOM 2617 OXT THR 85 40.474 20.274 3.412 means it has value – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 14:16

The main issue here is reading the data. First, note that one cannot use split with PDB text files since the fields are defined by position and not by separators. See Coordinate File Description (PDB Format).

To separate the ATOM record of different polymer chains you can start with a simplified version like

my $iblock = 0;
my @atoms = ();
while (my $line = <IN>) { 
   chomp($line);

   # Switch blocks at TER lines
   if ($line =~ /^TER/) {
      $iblock++;

   # Read ATOM lines
   } elsif ($line =~ m/^ATOM/) {
      my @xyz = (substr($line,7-1,9),substr($line,16-1,9),substr($line,25-1,9)); 
      printf "Block %d: atom at (%s)\n",$iblock,join (",",@xyz); 
      push @{$atoms[$iblock]},\@xyz; 

   # Parse additional line types (if needed)
   } else {
      ...
   }
} 

Followed by a loop over all pairs of coordinates from different blocks, structured as follows:

# 1st block
for my $iblock1 (0..$#atoms) {

   # 2nd block
   for my $iblock2 ($iblock1+1..$#atoms) {

      # Compare all pairs of atoms
      ... 
      my $xyz1 (@{$atoms[$iblock1]}) {
         for my $xyz2 (@{$atoms[$iblock2]}) {
            # Calculate distance and compare with $max_dist
            ...
         }
      }
      # Print the maximal distance between these two blocks
      ...
   }
}

Of course, the code could be more general if a more elaborate data structure is used or by applying one of the available PDB parsers, such as Bioperl's.

share|improve this answer

With proper encapsulation, this is pretty simple, and requires minor modifications of your code.

ETA: Added fixed width solution I had on hand. It would probably be best to read all the fields instead of discarding the first 31 chars, and then return them all in a hash reference. That way, you could process all the lines with the same subroutine, and simply switch between parts when the first field turns out to be TER. It should be easy for you to extrapolate this from the given code.

You'll note that the reference values are read in with a loop, because we need to break the loop at the break point. The rest of the values are slurped up with a map statement. Then we simply feed the data to the subroutine we made from your initial code (with some improvements). I used the same names for the lexical variables to make it easier to read the code.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @points;
while (<DATA>) {
    last if /^TER$/;
    push @points, getpoints($_);
}
my @ref = map getpoints($_), <DATA>;

for my $p (@points) {
    getcoords($p, \@ref);
}

sub getpoints {
    my $line = shift;
    my @data = unpack "A31 A8 A8 A8", $line;
    shift @data;
    return \@data;
}
sub getcoords {
    my ($p, $ref) = @_;
    my ($p1,$p2,$p3) = @$p;
    my $max=0;
    my ($x,$y,$z);
    for my $aref ( @$ref ) {
        my ( $x1, $y1, $z1 ) = @$aref;  
        my $dist = sqrt(
            ($x1-$p1)**2 +
            ($y1-$p2)**2 +
            ($z1-$p3)**2
        ); 
        print "distance from ($p1 $p2 $p3) to ( $x1, $y1, $z1 ) is $dist\n"; 

        if ( $dist > $max ) {
            $max = $dist;
            $x=$x1;
            $y=$y1;
            $z=$z1; 
        }
    }
    print "maximum value is : $max\n";
    print "co ordinates are : $x $y $z\n";
}

__DATA__
ATOM   1279 C    ALA    81      -1.925 -11.270   1.404
ATOM   1280 O    ALA    81      -0.279   9.355  15.557
ATOM   1281 OXT  ALA    81      -2.188  10.341  15.346
TER
ATOM   1282 N    THR    82      29.632   5.205   5.525
ATOM   1283 H1   THR    82      30.175   4.389   5.768
ATOM   1284 H2   THR    82      28.816   4.910   5.008
share|improve this answer
    
if i use the code for my file (40_0.pdb) it won't run.. – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 12:15
    
there seems to be some bug. the prog doesnot take the co ordinates after TER. it keeps them (0,0,0) – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 12:39
    
@kanika This is working code on my end. If it does not work on your end, then the problem is on your end. – TLP Mar 6 '12 at 13:29
    
i think its because some of the lines in the file are like ATOM 2597 HG22THR 84 44.438 16.785 1.083 ATOM 2598 HG23THR 84 45.228 18.247 1.394 – kanika Mar 6 '12 at 14:22
    
@kanika So then you go with the fixed width solution instead. It just happens I made that version too, just for fun. It's rather simple, but you may need to tweak the offset numbers. – TLP Mar 6 '12 at 14:43

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