Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to coding in C++ and am confused on how to separate implementation and declarations code of a simple class into a new header and cpp file. For example how would i separate the code for following class. Thanks in Advance.

class A2DD
{
  private:
  int gx;
  int gy;

  public:
  A2DD(int x,int y)
  {
    gx = x;
    gy = y;
  }

  int getSum()
  {
    return gx + gy;
  }
};
share|improve this question
2  
Just a couple of comments: The constructor should always use an initialization list instead of setting the members in the body. For a good and simple explanation, see: codeguru.com/forum/showthread.php?t=464084 It is also, at least most places, customary to have the public field at the top. It won't affect anything, but since the public fields is the documentation of your class, it makes sense to have that at the top. –  martiert Mar 6 '12 at 8:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

The class declaration goes into the header file. It is important that you add the #ifndef include guards, or if you are on a MS platform you also can use #pragma once. Also I have omitted the private, by default C++ class members are private.

// A2DD.h
#ifndef A2DD_H
#define A2DD_H

class A2DD
{
  int gx;
  int gy;

public:
  A2DD(int x,int y);
  int getSum();

};

#endif

and the implementation goes in the CPP file:

// A2DD.cpp
#include "A2DD.h"

A2DD::A2DD(int x,int y)
{
  gx = x;
  gy = y;
}

int A2DD::getSum()
{
  return gx + gy;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Remember that if you are doing template programming, then you have to keep everything in the .h file so that the compiler will instantiate the right code at the moment of compilation. –  linello Mar 6 '12 at 8:14
    
Nice... deserves a +1 :) –  fritzone Mar 6 '12 at 8:15
    
im getting an error with a duplicate symbol im not sure how to slove it .ld: duplicate symbol A2DD::A2DD(int, int)in ./src/rstring.o and ./src/A2DD.o for architecture x86_64 –  drdrdr Mar 6 '12 at 8:21
1  
So this means that all files that include your header file will "see" the private members. If for example you want to publish a lib and its header, you have to show the private members of the class? –  Gauthier Oct 23 '13 at 7:56
1  
No, there is the wonderful private implementation idiom: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opaque_pointer You can use it to hide the implementation details. –  fritzone Oct 23 '13 at 10:58

a2dd.h

class A2DD
{
  private:
  int gx;
  int gy;

  public:
  A2DD(int x,int y);

  int getSum();
};

a2dd.cpp

A2DD::A2DD(int x,int y)
  {
    gx = x;
    gy = y;
  }

 int A2DDgetSum()
  {
    return gx + gy;
  }

Basically a modified syntax of function declaration/definitions.

share|improve this answer

You leave the declarations in the header file:

class A2DD
{
  private:
  int gx;
  int gy;

  public:
    A2DD(int x,int y); // leave the declarations here
    int getSum();
};

And put the definitions in the implementation file.

A2DD::A2DD(int x,int y) // prefix the definitions with the class name
{
  gx = x;
  gy = y;
}

int A2DD::getSum()
{
  return gx + gy;
}

You could mix the two (leave getSum() definition in the header for instance). This is useful since it gives the compiler a better chance at inlining for example. But it also means that changing the implementation (if left in the header) could trigger a rebuild of all the other files that include the header.

Note that for templates, you need to keep it all in the headers.

share|improve this answer

A2DD.h

class A2DD
{
  private:
  int gx;
  int gy;

  public:
  A2DD(int x,int y);

  int getSum();
};

A2DD.cpp

  A2DD::A2DD(int x,int y)
  {
    gx = x;
    gy = y;
  }

  int A2DD::getSum()
  {
    return gx + gy;
  }

The idea is to keep all function signatures and members in the header file.
This will allow other project files to see how the class looks like without having to know the implementation.

And besides that, you can then include other header files in the implementation instead of the header. This is important because whichever headers are included in your header file will be included (inherited) in any other file that includes your header file.

share|improve this answer

Usually you put only declarations and really short inline functions in the header file:

For instance:

class A {
 public:
  A(); // only declaration in the .h unless only a short initialization list is used.

  inline int GetA() const {
    return a_;
  }

  void DoSomethingCoplex(); // only declaration
  private:
   int a_;
 };
share|improve this answer

In general your .h contains the class defition, which is all your data and all your method declarations. Like this in your case:

A2DD.h:

class A2DD
{
  private:
  int gx;
  int gy;

  public:
  A2DD(int x,int y);    
  int getSum();
};

And then your .cpp contains the implementations of the methods like this:

A2DD.cpp:

A2DD::A2DD(int x,int y)
{
  gx = x;
  gy = y;
}

int A2DD::getSum()
{
  return gx + gy;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.