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I'm trying to use JAXB to unmarshall some XML, but I'm getting an "Unable to create an instance of..." exception. I understand why--it's trying to make an instance of an abstract class. What I want is to have it make an instance of a specific implementing class. My goal with this is to have class-specific checks on setter methods. Maybe "qux" is a valid baz value for BarImpl, but BarImpl2 wants to do something else.

I got part of the way there by not annotating Foo, but if I unannotate bar, things get ugly.

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

import org.junit.Test;


public class JAXBTest {

    @Test
    public void test() throws javax.xml.bind.JAXBException {
        String xml = 
            "<foo>" +
            "  <bar>" +
            "    <baz>qux</baz>" +
            "  </bar>" +
            "</foo>";

        javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext context = javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext.newInstance(
                FooImpl.class,
                BarImpl.class
        );

        javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller unmarshaller = context.createUnmarshaller();

        unmarshaller.unmarshal(new java.io.StringReader(xml));
    }

    @XmlRootElement(name="foo")
    public static abstract class Foo {
        @XmlElement(name="bar")
        Bar bar;
    }

    @XmlRootElement(name="bar")
    public static abstract class Bar {
        @XmlElement(name="baz")
        String baz;
    }

    public static class FooImpl extends Foo { }
    public static class BarImpl extends Bar { }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could do the following:

JAXBTest

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElements;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlTransient;

import org.junit.Test;


public class JAXBTest {

    @Test
    public void test() throws javax.xml.bind.JAXBException {
        String xml = 
            "<foo>" +
            "  <bar>" +
            "    <baz>qux</baz>" +
            "  </bar>" +
            "</foo>";

        javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext context = javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext.newInstance(
                FooImpl.class,
                BarImpl.class
        );

        javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller unmarshaller = context.createUnmarshaller();

        unmarshaller.unmarshal(new java.io.StringReader(xml));
    }

    @XmlTransient
    public static abstract class Foo {
        @XmlElements({
            @XmlElement(name="bar",type=BarImpl.class),
            @XmlElement(name="bar",type=BarImpl2.class),
        })
        Bar bar;
    }

    @XmlTransient
    public static abstract class Bar {
        @XmlElement(name="baz")
        String baz;
    }

    @XmlRootElement(name="foo")
    public static class FooImpl extends Foo { }

    @XmlRootElement(name="bar")
    public static class BarImpl extends Bar { }

    public static class BarImpl2 extends Bar { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The one thing it's missing is that if I make BarImpl2, bar (in Foo) has already been marked as a BarImpl. –  David Ehrmann Mar 6 '12 at 17:29
    
I have updated my answer to use @XmlElements to handle this use case. –  Blaise Doughan Mar 6 '12 at 17:52
    
It worked! The only annoyance now is that the implementer of BarImpl2 needs to change the annotations in Foo, but it's only an annoyance. –  David Ehrmann Mar 7 '12 at 7:45
    
And if there's an abstract method without declaration of variable behind it? Say a bar getter but there is no bar variable declaration, can I still use @XmlElements... on the method itself to achieve the same behavior? –  Denys S. Jun 5 at 19:02

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