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I want to insert a comma after the first column and as well as before the last column of all the lines of a file in which each line has a varying number of fields.

E.g. this is file:

test1 test2 test3
test1 test2 test3 test4 test5 test6
test1 test2 test3 test4 
test1 test2 test3 test4 test5

I want to make it look like:

test1, test2, test3
test1, test2 test3 test4 test5, test6
test1, test2 test3, test4 
test1, test2 test3 test4, test5

I ma trying something like following but it is not working (either syntax error OR no expected output):

awk '{NF=NF-1;for (i=NF; i==NF; i--) $i="," print $NF }' my_file1
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semicolon missing –  Karoly Horvath Mar 6 '12 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need that for-loop. You're just changing two fields.

I find newlines (and other whitespace) can make awk (and other languages) a whole lot more readable:

% awk '{
    $1 = $1","
    $(NF - 1) = $(NF - 1)","
    print
}
' my_file1
test1, test2, test3
test1, test2 test3 test4 test5, test6
test1, test2 test3, test4
test1, test2 test3 test4, test5
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wait... what? you posted my solution with added whitespaces? –  Karoly Horvath Mar 6 '12 at 8:48
    
@KarolyHorvath: I'm a slower typist (and I was testing my answer before posting). I also up-voted yours when I saw it (it wasn't there when I started). Where's the missing '? –  Johnsyweb Mar 6 '12 at 8:51
1  
it's there, just not in the line I expected it to be. srry. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 6 '12 at 8:52
    
@Johnsyweb We can use 1 instead of print eg. awk '{$1=$1","; $(NF-1)=$(NF-1)","}1' my_file1 –  jaypal singh Mar 7 '12 at 5:22
    
@JaypalSingh: We can. I think my version's easier to understand for a beginner, though. –  Johnsyweb Mar 7 '12 at 8:25
awk '{ $1=$1","; $(NF-1)=$(NF-1)","; print }'

note: if NF=2 this will insert two commas after the first field, which is in line with what you asked but probably not what you really want. if you want to handle it just add an extra if.

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This is just what I needed. thanks Karoly for the fast response. –  slayedbylucifer Mar 6 '12 at 8:36
    
Agree...Thanks. –  slayedbylucifer Mar 6 '12 at 8:59

If you're interested in a sed answer: sed -e 's/ /, /' -e 's/\(.*\) /\1, /'

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This works as long as there is no white space following the last value. If there is white space at the end, try sed 's/ \(.*\) \(\S\)/, \1, \2/' –  potong Mar 6 '12 at 19:57

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