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I'm writing a flexible diamond-square terrain generator in C++. My grid of tiles for my terrain's height values is defined as a gigantic array of ints. Now, I have the entire diamond-square algorithm that manipulates this grid as a separate function, stdroutine. I can't declare the grid as a global variable, because I need the user to be able to define its size (within reason, though size-checking isn't implemented yet). I don't want to just stick the contents of stdroutine into main, because I want to be able to call it multiple times in a row without much hassle (which will eventually be required for some preset routines to run). So, I tried to give stdroutinethe pointer to my array, in hopes that it would be able to figure out where the array actually is if I tell it. stdroutineactually calls another function, mean, which also needs the grid to work. Here is my code (obscenely wrong, but oh well, I don't know any better):

main.cpp:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "mt.h"
#include "diamondsquare.h"

int main () {
    unsigned  long seed = 0, x = 0, y = 0, initial = 0, range = 0;
    int smooth = 0, fail = 1, index1 = 0, index2 = 0;
    char flagchar1 = 'n';
    printf("Welcome to my diamond-square generator! This isn't full-feature yet, so I'm just gonna have you input the variables one by one. ");
    do {
        printf("Please input the seed (this is a positive integer):\n");
        fail = scanf("%lu", &seed);
        while (fail == 0) {
            printf("Try again, smartass.\n");
            fail = scanf("%lu", &seed);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("Now input the x, or horizontal, size of your grid:\n");
        fail = scanf("%lu", &x);
        while (fail == 0) {
            printf("An integer. Not a string. An integer. You can do that, can't you?\n");
            fail = scanf("%lu", &x);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("Now input the y, or vertical, size of your grid:\n");
        fail = scanf("%lu", &y);
        while (fail == 0) {
            printf("What was that supposed to be? An integer, please.\n");
            fail = scanf("%lu", &y);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("Now input about how high you'd like the grid to be (this goes from a scale of 1 to 256):\n");
        fail = scanf("%lu", &initial);
        while (initial == 0 || initial > 256 || fail == 0) {
            printf("ahahahahaha how HIGH do you have to be just to HAVE that hieght........\n");
            fail = scanf("%lu", &initial);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("Now input the range of the heights on your grid (this must be equal to or less than 256):\n");
        scanf("%lu", &range);
        while (range >= 256 || fail == 0) {
            printf("What did I say about being equal to or less than 256? Give me something reasonable to work with here.\n");
            fail = scanf("%lu", &range);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("Just one more variable to go! Now, I need you to input the smoothness of your grid. Smaller numbers make spikier grids. You can make this negative, but beware!\n");
        fail = scanf("%d", &smooth);
        while (fail == 0) {
            printf("That... was not a number.\n");
            fail = scanf("%d", &smooth);
        }
        fail = 1;
        printf("\nOkay. Are these the values you want? Type Y/n.\n   Seed:       %lu\n   Width:      %lu\n   Length:     %lu\n   Height:     %lu\n   Range:      %lu\n   Smoothness: %d\n", seed, x, y, initial, range, smooth);
        // Ignore remaining characters on current line.
        int ch;
        while( (ch = getchar()) != EOF && ch != '\n')
            ;
        // fetch first character on next line
        flagchar1 = getchar();
    } while (flagchar1 != 'y' && flagchar1 != 'Y' && flagchar1 != '\n');
    printf("Welp, time to get started!\n\n");
    printf("Twisting primes...\n");                  // Initializes the Mersenne twister.
    mt_init(seed);
    printf("Scrawling preliminary etchings...\n");   // Presets as many values on the grid as is called for.
    printf("Creating depth matrix...\n");            // Declares grid.
    int grid [x] [y];
    printf("Nullifying grid constants...\n");        // Sets all values in grid to 0.
    for (index1 = 0; index1 < x; index1++) {
        for (index2 = 0; index2 < y; index2++) {
            grid [index1] [index2] = 0;
        }
    }
    printf("Filling rhombus circumcenters...\n");     // Actually runs the diamond-square algorithm.
    stdroutine(initial, range, smooth, x, y, &grid);
    printf("Inserting strategic aberrations...");     // Runs any postgenerational script a tag needs (currently only needed for "glacier" tag).
    printf("Applying planetary fabrics...\n");        // Sets the materials of all tiles6.
    printf("Scraping irregularities into suface..."); // Simulates erosion.
    printf("Discharging liquids...\n");               // Inserts liquids.
    printf("Populating biosphere...\n");              // Inserts plants, animals.
    printf("Constructing civilized edifices...\n");   // Inserts structures.
}

diamond-square.h:

int mean (bool sqd, unsigned long mx, unsigned long my, unsigned long x, unsigned long y, int** grid [x] [y]) {
    int x1 = mx, x2 = mx, x3 = mx, x4 = mx, y1 = my, y2 = my, y3 = my, y4 = my;
    int avg;
    if (sqd == false) {
        do {
            y1++;
        } while (**grid [x1] [y1]);
        do {
            x2++;
        } while (**grid [x2] [y2]);
        do {
            y3--;
        } while (**grid [x3] [y3]);
        do {
            x4--;
        } while (**grid [x4] [y4]);
        avg = (**grid [x1] [y1] + **grid [x2] [y2] + **grid [x3] [y3] + **grid [x4] [y4]) / 4;
        return avg;
    }
    else if (sqd == true) {
        do {
            x1--;
            y1++;
        } while (**grid [x1] [y1]);
        do {
            x2++;
            y2++;
        } while (**grid [x2] [y2]);
        do {
            x3++;
            y3--;
        } while (**grid [x3] [y3]);
        do {
            x4--;
            y4--;
        } while (**grid [x4] [y4]);
        avg = (**grid [x1] [y1] + **grid [x2] [y2] + **grid [x3] [y3] + **grid [x4] [y4]) / 4;
        return avg;
    }
    else
        return 0;
}

void stdroutine (unsigned long i, unsigned long r, int h, unsigned long x, unsigned long y, int* grid [x] [y]) { // LADIES AND GENTLEMEN... THE DIAMOND-SQUARE ALGORITHM.
    *grid [0] [0] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2)); // Set
    *grid [x] [0] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2)); // the
    *grid [0] [y] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2)); // four
    *grid [x] [y] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2)); // corners.
    int sect = 2;                                    // This is the subdivision and iteration count of our diamond-square algorithm.
    while (x / sect != x || y / sect != y) {
        for (int n = 1; n < sect; n++) // The square algorithm: it finds a point in the middle of every square, and sets it to the mean of the four corners of the square, plus a little offset. In theory, anyway.
            for (int m = 1; m < sect; m++)
                if (*grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // If it's already been given a value, just leave it.
                    *grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean(true, (x * (m/sect)), (y * (n/sect)), x, y) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
        for (int n = 0; n == sect; n++)     // The diamond algorithm: it finds a point in the middle of every diamond, and it sets it to the mean of the four corners of the diamond, plus a little offset. In theory, anyway.
            for (int m = 0; m == sect; m++) {
                if (n % 2 == 0)
                    if (m % 2 == 1)
                        if (*grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // Same deal here. We don't want to overwrite existing stuff.
                            *grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean (false, (x * (m/sect)), y * (n/sect), x, y, &grid) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
                if (n % 2 == 1)
                    if (m % 2 == 0)
                        if (*grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // Again, we only want to change positions that haven't been changed yet.
                    *grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean (false, (x * (m/sect)), (y * (n/sect)), x, y, &grid) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
            }
        sect++; // Increment sect for the next iteration. I am perfectly aware that this could have been done as a for loop.
    }
}

(mt.h simply contains two routines, mt_init and mt_random, which respectively initialize and run a Mersenne twister PRNG.)

How do I make my pointers to grid play nice with all the functions that call them? At the moment, I get four errors from Xcode 4.3, three in diamond-square.h, "No matching function for call to 'mean'", and one in main.cpp, "No matching function for call to 'stdroutine'".

EDIT: Hmm, simpler than I thought. I still have a problem though, see comments. Relevant code (main.cpp is the same, but I've left out the ampersand before grid in the call to stdroutine):

int mean (bool sqd, unsigned long mx, unsigned long my, unsigned long x, unsigned long y, const int grid [] [y]) {
    int x1 = mx, x2 = mx, x3 = mx, x4 = mx, y1 = my, y2 = my, y3 = my, y4 = my;
    int avg;
    if (sqd) {
        do {
            x1--;
            y1++;
        } while (grid [x1] [y1]);
        do {
            x2++;
            y2++;
        } while (grid [x2] [y2]);
        do {
            x3++;
            y3--;
        } while (grid [x3] [y3]);
        do {
            x4--;
            y4--;
        } while (grid [x4] [y4]);
        avg = (grid [x1] [y1] + grid [x2] [y2] + grid [x3] [y3] + grid [x4] [y4]) / 4;
        return avg;
    }
    else {
        do {
            y1++;
        } while (grid [x1] [y1]);
        do {
            x2++;
        } while (grid [x2] [y2]);
        do {
            y3--;
        } while (grid [x3] [y3]);
        do {
            x4--;
        } while (grid [x4] [y4]);
        avg = (grid [x1] [y1] + grid [x2] [y2] + grid [x3] [y3] + grid [x4] [y4]) / 4;
        return avg;
    }
}

void stdroutine (unsigned long i, unsigned long r, int h, unsigned long x, unsigned long y, int grid [] [y]) { // LADIES AND GENTLEMEN... THE DIAMOND-SQUARE ALGORITHM.
    grid [0] [0] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2));     // Set
    grid [x-1] [0] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2));   // the
    grid [0] [y-1] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2));   // four
    grid [x-1] [y-1] = i + ((mt_random() % r) - (r/2)); // corners.
    int sect = 2;                                        // This is the subdivision and iteration count of our diamond-square algorithm.
    while (x / sect != x || y / sect != y) {
        for (int n = 1; n < sect; n++) // The square algorithm: it finds a point in the middle of every square, and sets it to the mean of the four corners of the square, plus a little offset. In theory, anyway.
            for (int m = 1; m < sect; m++)
                if (grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // If it's already been given a value, just leave it.
                    grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean(true, (x * (m/sect)), (y * (n/sect)), x, y, grid) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
        for (int n = 0; n == sect; n++)     // The diamond algorithm: it finds a point in the middle of every diamond, and it sets it to the mean of the four corners of the diamond, plus a little offset. In theory, anyway.
            for (int m = 0; m == sect; m++) {
                if (n % 2 == 0)
                    if (m % 2 == 1)
                        if (grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // Same deal here. We don't want to overwrite existing stuff.
                            grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean (false, (x * (m/sect)), y * (n/sect), x, y, grid) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
                if (n % 2 == 1)
                    if (m % 2 == 0)
                        if (grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] == 0) // Again, we only want to change positions that haven't been changed yet.
                    grid [x * (m/sect)] [y * (n/sect)] = mean (false, (x * (m/sect)), (y * (n/sect)), x, y, grid) + ((mt_random() % (r - h)) - ((r - h)/2)); // Randomize the location's height.
            }
        sect++; // Increment sect for the next iteration. I am perfectly aware that this could have been done as a for loop.
    }
    return;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your definition of mean has int **grid[x][y] as the final argument but in the square algorithm section you do not pass grid to mean. In your initial setup you set the corners at (0,0), (x,0), (0,y) and (x,y). The arrays should be indexed as (0,0), (x-1,0), (0,y-1), (x-1, y-1). –  DanS Mar 6 '12 at 8:50
    
That's a good point— thanks for catching that! –  mszegedy Mar 6 '12 at 8:56
    
Looking at mean(), I'm not sure why you are passing int **grid[x][y]. The usual reason for passing a pointer to a pointer is so you can change the size of the array. As you are dealing with an array, it is already a pointer so there is no benefit in argument size. I would simplify it and pass int grid[][] or const int grid[][]. Also I think that the if (sqd == false) { } else if (sqd == true){ } would be better written as if (sqd){ } else { } –  DanS Mar 6 '12 at 9:14
    
@DanS I guess so. This started out as simply C, and sqd used to be an unsigned short int, so I had to have a backup plan in case it theoretically was called with a number other than 0 or 1. But wouldn't I need a pointer for mean? Like, at least declare it as an int*? –  mszegedy Mar 6 '12 at 9:27
    
In C false is 0 and true is non-zero (not necessarily 1). I would write the same in C. Why would you need an extra level of indirection in the call to mean? int grid[x][y] is already a pointer. There is very little difference between a pointer and an array when used as a function argument. This is discussed here lysator.liu.se/c/c-faq/c-2.html –  DanS Mar 6 '12 at 10:13

1 Answer 1

I've been doing a bit more thinking and experimentation. I don't think that it's legal C or C++ to declare a parameter as int grid [] [y] unless y is a constant known at compile time. You could have the parameter as int grid[] and then index it as grid [y * ncolumns +x]. You need to pass the pointer in to the methos as &grid[0][0].

You could also do this using a method template that takes the array dimensions as template parameters.

share|improve this answer

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