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>>> class Test(object):
...   test = {}
... 
>>> class Test2(Test):
...   pass
... 
>>> Test2.test.update({1:2})
>>> Test.test
{1: 2}
>>> 

I was expecting {}. Happens also with old style classes.

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Care to explin why would you explain anything different? Where would the Test2 instance of the "test" class attribute come from? Pure magic? –  jsbueno Mar 6 '12 at 19:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's nothing odd with how update works. The point is that test is a class attribute, and class attributes are shared between classes, (untill someone rebinds test to something else).

Take a look at this IDE session:

>>> class Test(object):
...     test = {}
... 
>>> class Test2(Test):
...     pass
... 
>>> id(Test.test)
32424144
>>> id(Test2.test)
32424144
>>> Test.test.update({1:2})
>>> Test2.test
{1: 2}
>>> Test2.test = {}
>>> id(Test2.test)
32424480
>>> Test.test
{1: 2}
>>> Test2.test
{}
>>> del Test2.test
>>> Test2.test
{1: 2}

For further informations on how class attributes works look at Data Model Reference under Classes.

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You need to use 2 underscores to activate the class/attribute munging

>>> class Test(object):
...     __test = {}
...
>>> class Test2(Test):
...     pass
...
>>> Test2.__test.update({1:2})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: type object 'Test2' has no attribute '__test'

Because of the attribute munging the attribute can be found at Test2._Test__test instead

If you want all the subclasses to automatically get their own __test attribute you can use a metaclass for Test

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Oops. Sorry. I wasn't really trying to hide the attribute. –  MarkSteve Mar 6 '12 at 9:03
    
Setting the attribute itself doesn't update the base class. There's something odd with the update method of dictionaries. –  MarkSteve Mar 6 '12 at 9:08
Test2.test.update({1:2})

This updates you base class Test attribute, which was inherited by Test2.

If you want want each of them to have their own dict, do:

>>> class Test(object):
...     test = {}
... 
>>> class Test2(Test):
...     test = {}
... 
>>> Test2.test.update({1:2})
>>> Test.test
{}
>>> 

Python has a feature which i like very much: data inheritance, which you just have seen in action.

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This is a matter of references. Take for example:

>>> class Test(object):
...   val = 1
... 
>>> class Test2(Test):
...   pass
... 
>>> Test2.val = 2
>>> Test.val
1

Here for the subclass val is reassigned to 2.

For lists and dictionaries both refer to the same object and any update/append will be visible in superclass. If you however reasign:

>>> class Test(object):
...   test = {}
... 
>>> class Test2(Test):
...   pass
... 
>>> Test2.test = {1:2}
>>> Test.test
{}
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Because they are the same object. More accurately, Test2.test is a way of accessing the same thing that Test.test does, because, when it is not found locally, it is looked up in the superclass.

I don't understand why would you expect any differently. (It doesn't work the way you're expecting in any other languages I can think of, either.)

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