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I have a hierarchical navigation menu in my sidebar that uses nested lists (<ul> and <li> tags). I am using a pre-made theme which already has styles for list items, but I want to alter the style for the top-level items but NOT have it apply to the sub-items. Is there an easy way to apply styles to the top-level list item tag WITHOUT having those styles cascade down to its children list items? I understand that I can explicitly add overriding styles to the sub-items but I'd really like to avoid having to duplicate all of that style code if there is an easy way to just say "apply these styles to this class and DO NOT cascade them down to any children elements". Here is the html I'm using:

<ul id="sidebar">
  <li class="top-level-nav">
    <span>HEADING 1</span>
    <ul>
      <li>sub-heading A</li>
      <li>sub-heading B</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li class="top-level-nav">
    <span>HEADING 2</span>
    <ul>
      <li>sub-heading A</li>
      <li>sub-heading B</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

So the css has styles for "#sidebar ul" and "#sidebar ul li" already, but I'd like to add additional styles to "#sidebar .top-level-nav" that do NOT cascade down to its subchildren. Is there any way to do this simply or do I need to rearrange all of the styles so the styles that were on "#sidebar ul" are now specific to certain classes.

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1  
I did search the site for similar questions and didn't find anything (not saying there isn't one, but I did look). If you know what it is could you please direct me to it? Thanks! – Jordan Lev Jun 5 '09 at 21:13
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/747308/breaking-css-inheritance | it pretty much says what Matthew answered. – JasonV Jun 5 '09 at 21:17
1  
So I take it the answer is "no, there is no way to do that simply -- you have to manually override every style setting on the sub-item" -- am I interpreting this correctly? Thanks again. – Jordan Lev Jun 5 '09 at 21:22
up vote 18 down vote accepted

As of yet there are no parent selectors (or as Shaun Inman calls them, qualified selectors), so you will have to apply styles to the child list items to override the styles on the parent list items.

Cascading is sort of the whole point of Cascading Style Sheets, hence the name.

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6  
This information is outdated since IE8. See the answer by Silviu Postavaru. Please consider to change the check to the more appropriate answer. – tmuecksch May 24 '13 at 13:17

You either use the child selector

So using

#parent > child

Will make only the first level children to have the styles applied. Unfortunately IE6 doesn't support the child selector.

Otherwise you can use

#parent child child

To set another specific styles to children that are more than one level below.

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8  
This is the most appropriate solution. – Bluebaron Jun 1 '12 at 15:51
    
How to set this, tried in chrome inspector with no avail. – pal4life Jan 14 '13 at 19:13
    
Could you show me this in action in JSFiddle? I tried to center a inline-block displayed div, but it still centers the text inside the div. – Calmarius Feb 19 '14 at 18:49

You can use the * selector to change the child styles back to the default

example

#parent {
    white-space: pre-wrap;
}

#parent * {
    white-space: initial;
}
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That's a very handsome solution - especially if you do not know the parent's class. – BurninLeo Feb 7 '15 at 16:39
    
I think I know the answer to this but is there anyway to set this inline? <div id="parent" style="white-space:pre-wrap;*white-space:initial;"/> – 1.21 gigawatts Nov 10 '15 at 3:39

There is a property called all in the CSS3 inheritance module. It works like this:

#sidebar ul li {
  all: default;
}

As far as I know, no browser supports this, though.

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So what's the point of this property then? – Andrius Dobrotinas Sep 25 '15 at 7:59
1  
@AndriusDobrotinas to become supported eventually? I seem to not completely grasp your comment. There is a PostCSS plugin that provides this feature, if you use PostCSS: github.com/maximkoretskiy/postcss-initial – Boldewyn Sep 25 '15 at 8:01

You don't need the class reference for the lis. Instead of having CSS like

li.top-level-nav { color:black; }

you can write

ul#sidebar > li { color:black; }

This will apply the styling only to lis that immediately descend from the sidebar ul.

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Wrapping with iframe makes parent css obsolete.

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1  
Funny that this is the worst maked answer because technically it is the only physical way to stop CSS inheritance. Not that I am arguing that you should use it this way. – davidelrizzo Mar 16 '15 at 1:20
    
I'd suggest not getting physical with CSS, leave it in the virtual world where it belongs! – michaelward82 Jan 22 at 9:27

For example if you have two div in XHTML document.

<div id='div1'>
    <p>hello, how are you?</p>
    <div id='div2'>
        <p>I am fine, thank you.</p>
    </div>
</div>

Then try this in CSS.

#div1 > #div2 > p{
    color: red;
}

affect only 'div2' paragraph.

#div1 > p {
    color: red;
} 

affect only 'div1' paragraph.

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You could use something like jQuery to "disable" this behaviour, though I hardly think it's a good solution as you get display logic in css & javascript. Still, depending upon your requirements you might find jQuery's css utils make life easier for you than trying hacky css, especially if you're trying to make it work for IE6

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just set them back to their defaults in the "#sidebar ul li" selector

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Yes I understand that I can set them back in the sub-item's style, but I'm trying to avoid that because I'm using a theme that I didn't create and I'm wondering if I can save a bunch of time by just using some "do-not-cascade: true" rule or something like that, instead of locating all the different styles for the ul's and li's which are scattered all over the place and then worrying about unintended consequences in other areas of the site. – Jordan Lev Jun 5 '09 at 21:20

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