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I want my handler of the ready event will fire after all other handlers are done.
It's extremely handy for manipulating plugins' undesired actions.

If I write my handler after all others, it only guarantees it will fire after all others fired, not finished:

$(function() {
    setTimeout(function() { alert('other handler'); }, 500);
});


$(function() { alert('my handler'); });​

Fiddle

In that code, my handler alerted first.

I read that before jQuery version 1.4 the readyList was public. so in version 1.7 I have no idea how I can tell that my handler is the last handler or not.

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take a look at api.jquery.com/deferred.promise –  Kris Ivanov Mar 6 '12 at 10:53
    
If the idea is that you don't control the other ready handlers, then given your example where another handler used a setTimeout, you can never actually know (without inspecting the other code) if your code will run after all other code. The readyList wouldn't help even if it was public, because in your example, the handler with the setTimeout will be removed from the ready list long before the setTimeout handler runs. The readyList Array doesn't have any control over that sort of asynchronous code either. Hope I've understood your question correctly. –  squint Mar 6 '12 at 14:19
    
@gdoron, have you tried some of the answers given? –  Fabrizio Calderan Mar 6 '12 at 14:20
    
@amnotiam. Yes you have. So do you have a solution for this kind of scenarios? There isn't really a setTimeout in the external code, but that code might takes a "long" time until it's finished. It has many lines of code, selectors and callbacks. So I can't be sure that my code will run after the plugin finished. Any Ideas? –  gdoron Mar 6 '12 at 14:25
1  
If you don't control (can't modify) the other code, then I really don't have a solution. But if the other code is just long running, but not asynchronous, then there wouldn't be any issue, because if your code is the last .ready() handler assigned, it shouldn't matter how long the other handlers take to execute. If their code as synchronous, it will force yours to wait until they're complete. It's just that if they're asynchronous, like your setTimeout example, then there's nothing you can do short of examining the other code, and modifying yours to make sure it fires last. –  squint Mar 6 '12 at 14:32
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the idea is that you don't control the other ready handlers, then given your example where another handler used a setTimeout, you can never actually know (without inspecting the other code) if your code will run after all other code.

The readyList wouldn't help even if it was public, because in your example, the handler with the setTimeout will be removed from the readyList long before the setTimeout handler runs. The readyList Array doesn't have any control over that sort of asynchronous code either.

So if you don't control (can't modify) the other code, then I really don't have a solution. But if the other code is just long running, but not asynchronous, then there wouldn't be any issue, because if your code is the last .ready() handler assigned, it shouldn't matter how long the other handlers take to execute. If their code is synchronous, it will force yours to wait until they're complete. It's just that if they're using asynchronous code, like your setTimeout example, then there's nothing you can do short of examining the other code, and modifying yours to make sure it fires last.

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Wanna collect some more rep here ? You are my guru, sorry for that... =) –  gdoron Mar 6 '12 at 15:16
    
I'll post a comment, because it's just another edge case. I like pimvdb's answer. –  squint Mar 6 '12 at 15:26
add comment

You can use something like this:

function Join(cb) {
    var paths = 0;
    var triggerCallback = cb;

    this.add = function () {
        paths ++;
        return this.call;
    };

    this.call = function () {
        paths --;
        if (paths == 0)
            if (triggerCallback)
                triggerCallback();
    };

    return this;
}

An example:

function finishedAll() {
    alert("All finished");
}

window.join = new Join(finishedAll);

function sampleCall(callJoinHandle) {
    alert("Not done yet.");
    if (callJoinHandle) callJoinHandle();
}

var cb1 = join.add();
setTimeout(function () { sampleCall(cb1); }, 1000);

var cb2 = join.add();
setTimeout(function () { sampleCall(cb2); }, 1000);

var cb3 = join.add();
setTimeout(function () { sampleCall(cb3); }, 1000);
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An idea could be creating an array of deferred to use inside every ready function (except the last one), resolving each one when the snippet has completed.

Then, in the last ready function you could simply check the promise resolution with $.when and then execute some other code: e.g.

var dfdArray = [];

$(function() {
    var dfd = $.Deferred();
    dfdArray.push(dfd);
    setTimeout(function() { 
      console.log('another simple handler'); 
      dfd.resolve(); 
    }, 2000);
});


$(function() {
    var dfd = $.Deferred();
    dfdArray.push(dfd);
    setTimeout(function() { 
        console.log('first handler'); 
        dfd.resolve(); 
    }, 1200);
});


$(function() {
    $.when.apply($, dfdArray).done(function() {
      alert('my final handler');
    })
});

See fiddle in action here: http://jsfiddle.net/DXaw5/

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Thanks for your input! But that will help me only if I'm the owner of all the handlers. Any idea what can I do if I'm not? –  gdoron Mar 6 '12 at 14:26
    
I don't think it's possibile, in some way you should need to be able to attach some kind of "observer" or a wrapper to manage the task execution. –  Fabrizio Calderan Mar 6 '12 at 14:31
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I don't know if it is possible for you to create a queue for all the functions like

var queue = [];
queue .push(fun1);
queue .push(fun2);

//execute the first function and remove it.
(queue .shift())();
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I usually use the following pattern, simply keepig a counter of finished async functions:

var fired = 10;
var finished = 0;

for (var i = 0; i < fired; i++) {    
    // Call an asynchronous function 10 times
    async_function(function() {
        // When asynchronous function finishes,
        // we check if it was the last one.
        if (++finished == fired) all_ready();
    });
}

The same in coffeescript:

fired = 10
finished = 0
(async_function -> all_ready() if ++finished == ready) for n in [0...fired]

(We call the same function for 10 times to keep the example simple, while in reality you may of course call different functions, but the same idea apply; in callback function you check the counter.)

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Whoever downvoted my answer, care to explain why? –  jholster Jul 15 '13 at 14:14
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