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What I would like is to do this:

var theId = anId;

$('#someId .someClass[id=' + theId + ']').css('border-color', 'red');

...but using a varible for the "selector part":

var mySelector;

if(condition1){mySelector= $('#someId .someClass');}
if(condition2){mySelector= $('#anotherId .anotherClass');}

$.each(anArray, function(i, v) {
    mySelector[id=' + v.id + '].css('border-color', 'red'); 
});

(This is unfortunately not working. I need help for correcting this syntax)

I tried several syntax that did not work. Hope someone can help. Thank you in advance for your replies. Cheers. Marc.

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I don't undertand, you want a child of .someClass that has an ID of theId? –  Mild Fuzz Mar 6 '12 at 10:43
    
This question is pretty confusing. Selectors are nothing else than strings and $() does not return a selector. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Mar 6 '12 at 10:45
    
It's not clear what you want. Your first sample should work. Your second sample is unclear to me. –  Tomalak Mar 6 '12 at 10:45
3  
Can't you just use $('#' + theId)? –  Jørgen Mar 6 '12 at 10:46
    
Hello everyone. Thanks for trying to help. I modified what I am trying to do but which is not working. I edited my post. Have a check... –  Marc Mar 6 '12 at 10:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After your edit, I think you should do this:

var mySelector_string;
var theId = anId;

if(condition1){mySelector_string= '#someId .someClass';}
if(condition2){mySelector_string= '#anotherId .anotherClass';}

$.each(anArray, function(i, v) {
    $(mySelector_string+"[id='" + v.id + "']").css('border-color', 'red'); 
});
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Why is return false; in there? –  SpaceBison Mar 6 '12 at 10:52
    
Efficiency; when the condition is met, we exit from the cycle. –  DotMat Mar 6 '12 at 10:56
    
Hello DotMat. This is not what I am looking for. Proberly because I was not clear in my post. I just edited it. You can check. It will be more clear to you what I am tring to do now... –  Marc Mar 6 '12 at 11:05
    
I have updated the answer, is it ok now? –  DotMat Mar 6 '12 at 11:26
    
Thanks a lot for replying. Give me a minute, I'll check... –  Marc Mar 6 '12 at 11:30
$('#someId .someClass #'+theId).css('border-color', 'red');

will get a child of .someClass with id theId

$('#someId .someClass#'+theId).css('border-color', 'red');

will get an instance of .someClass with id theId

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Hello Mild Fuzz. This is not what I am looking for. Proberly because I was not clear in my post. I just edited it. You can check. It will be more clear to you what I am tring to do now... –  Marc Mar 6 '12 at 11:05

If your question is how you can cache a selector which is dynamically constructed for re-use, then you can do the following:

$("div p a " + someOtherSelectorRequirement).click(function(){ });

can become

var a = $("div p a " + someOtherSelectorRequirement);
a.each(function(){ Console.Log($(this).text());
a.addClass("someClass");

if you are asking if you can re-use the same selector in an object, or variable.

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Hello SpaceBison. This is not what I am looking for. Proberly because I was not clear in my post. I just edited it. You can check. It will be more clear to you what I am tring to do now... –  Marc Mar 6 '12 at 11:06

I think there're a couple of misused terms in your question. Learning them will probably help you to fix your code.

jQuery object instance: it's a JavaScript object that (among other things) contains a possibly empty internal array of DOM nodes on which you can perform further operations. You obtain one every time you call jQuery() (possibly aliased as $()).

Selector: It's a JavaScript string that represents a CSS query rule, e.g.: "ul>li:first". Many functions in jQuery, including the jQuery() function, accept selectors as parameters and use them to find or filter DOM nodes in the current chain.

So you basically have strings and objects and both are regular JavaScript data types and behave as such. You can, for instance, store them in variables or pass them as function arguments. You just need to know the difference between a CSS selector and the HTML elements found through it.

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