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Charset charset = Charset.forName("US-ASCII");
try (BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(file, charset)) {
    String line = null;
    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(line);
    }
} catch (IOException x) {
    System.err.format("IOException: %s%n", x);
}

I saw such a piece of code on The Java Tutorials, in which a bracket statement is after key word 'try'. Is this valid? why cannot eclipse recognize it and report syntax error?

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(I wonder why they have that redundant assignment.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 7 '12 at 1:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is the Java 7's try with resource feature.

You need to set Eclipse's Compiler Compliance level to 1.7 for it to recognize the syntax.

You can either set it globally under Window > Preferences > Java > Compiler or simply right-click on the project and do as shown below:

enter image description here

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The OP says: "why cannot eclipse recognize it and report syntax error?" - his Eclipse recognizes this syntax, it already works with 1.7 JDK... –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 6 '12 at 10:53
    
Further Question:I installed JRE1.7 into Eclipse(by Windows-Preference-Java-Installed JRE) and was able to import related packages. But I cannot find 1.7 in Executation Env, and also cannot set Complier compliance level as 1.7. WHY? –  user796857 Mar 7 '12 at 7:08
    
@user796857 Because what you need is the JDK, not the JRE. –  adarshr Mar 7 '12 at 9:08

Eclipse clearly indicates why this is not valid syntax:

Set project compiler compliance settings to 1.7

Set project JRE build path entry to 'JavaSE-1.7'

That means, you have Java 6 installed, but the tutorials

(...) primarily describe features in Java SE 7.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/index.html

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This is a try-with-resource syntax introduced in Java 7. It is supported by Eclise, that's why it is not reporting any error:

Eclipse

BTW your code also uses Files introduced in Java 7.

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No, it's not valid. Try this:

Charset charset = Charset.forName("US-ASCII");
try {
    BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(file, charset);
    String line = null;
    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(line);
    }
} catch (IOException x) {
    System.err.format("IOException: %s%n", x);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Ever heard of Java 7? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 6 '12 at 10:53
1  
This question is not tagged "java 7", so this answer is correct given the (reasonable) assumption that we're in java 6 land –  Bohemian Mar 6 '12 at 11:17
    
Agree, but it looks like the OP simply wasn't aware of Java 7 existence and features. BTW Java 6 end of life is scheduled for this November: oracle.com/technetwork/java/eol-135779.html –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 6 '12 at 11:48

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