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Is pyparsing a table-driven, predictive top-down parser or a backtracking, top-down one? Google hasn't turned up any results for me.

If it's not a table-driven, predictive top-down parser, can anybody please tell me one that really is table-driven, predictive top-down parser in python.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

pyparsing is (vaguely) recursive descent with backtracking - there's some discussion about exactly how you would describe it.

sounds like you want something like the python wrapper to antlr which is predictive top-down, as far as i can tell (paper) and should be significantly faster on large problems (but conversely will be less flexible, particularly because it's a wrapper).

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Pyparsing is not in any way top-down or predictive. There is no table built by the parser to define parsing alternatives, and any lookahead that might be required has to be explicitly implemented by you.

It is a shame you wasted so much time on The Google, when about 2 minutes installing pyparsing and another 20 minutes of simple experimenting would have told you pretty much the same thing.

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You wouldn't describe 'vaguely recursive descent' as 'top-down'? –  EJP Mar 8 '12 at 0:31
    
I've always thought of it as more 'bottom-up' really, since each low-level primitive is tested in turn before moving on to the next. If something is 'top-down', then I would expect that it would be good at backtracking, or matching starting and ending and working toward the middle. pyparsing does not see the big picture ever, except as the brute force accumulation of the smaller parts, which is not always the best approach. For instance, pyparsing cannot parse "start blah bleh end" using "start" + OneOrMore(Word(alphas)) + "end", but I would expect something "top-down" would. –  Paul McGuire Mar 8 '12 at 3:03
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Then you would be mistaken. See any compiler textbook. –  EJP Mar 8 '12 at 4:01

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