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Following the help in this question, I am using a reference to my Class 'Mover' to manipulate the object (as part of a set) in a vector. I am having issues however, and I cannot seem to identify what's causing it for sure. It appears that once I've reached 30-35 objects in my vector (added at pseudo-random intervals) the program halts. No crash, just halt, and I have to manually end the task (CTRL-C doesn't work).

My problem appears to lie in these bits of code. My original:

int main() {
std::vector< Mover > allMovers;
std::vector< Mover >::iterator iter = allMovers.begin(); 
//This code runs to the end, but the 'do stuff' lines don't actually do anything.
Mover tempMover;
//Other code
while(iter < allMovers.end()) {
tempMover = *iter;
//Do stuff with tempMover
//Add another tempMover at a random interval
allMovers.push_back(CreateNewMover());
iter++;
}
//Other code
}

My update after the previous question linked to above:

int main() {
std::vector< Mover > allMovers;
std::vector< Mover >::iterator iter = allMovers.begin(); 
//This code crashes once about 30 or so items exist in the vector, but the 'do stuff' lines do work.
//Other code
while(iter < allMovers.end()) {
Mover& tempMover = *iter;
//Do stuff with tempMover
//Add another tempMover at a random interval
allMovers.push_back(CreateNewMover()); //Crashes here.
iter++;
}
//Other code
}

Any ideas of how to track this down? I have std::couts all over the place to flag where the code is for me. The crash (while happens at a varied number of objects) always crashes on the push_back(), despite having worked successfully multiple times in the same run before the crash.

EDIT

While I accept and (think) I understand the answer re: iterators, what I don't understand is why the code DOES work completely when I am not using a reference to the object? (First code block).

Another EDIT In case anyone was looking for this specifically, part of my question was not addressed: "How to debug?" As a C++ newbie, I was unaware of the gdb debugger (using MinGW). Now that I've learned about it, it has been very helpful in finding the source of these issues.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When a vector reallocates its memory, all iterators are invalidated (along with any reference or pointer to any element). So sometimes your push_back will invalidate iter, and trying to use it afterwards gives undefined behaviour.

The simplest fix is to use an index rather than an iterator. Alternatively, if you can calculate an upper bound for the maximum size of the vector, you could call reserve before the loop to ensure it never reallocates. Or you could use std::list, whose iterators are preserved when new elements are inserted.

UPDATE: Regarding your edit, both give undefined behaviour. It might be that, in the first case, you don't crash because you don't access a dangling reference (while accessing tempMover in the second might very well crash), and then the memory happens to be reallocated at a lower address than before, so the while condition (which uses < rather than the more conventional !=) exits the loop immediately. Or something completely different could be happening - that's the nature of undefined behaviour.

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You're right, I totally missed that. +1 –  Luchian Grigore Mar 6 '12 at 12:51
    
I did try an index before. However, I had issues with increasing the loop maximum when I did that. As I write this, I can see how to avoid that, so I think I'll be going back to that method. Thanks! –  Gaffi Mar 6 '12 at 13:10
1  
@Gaffi: You can use allMovers.size() in the while condition to make sure it's always up-to-date. –  Matthieu M. Mar 6 '12 at 13:29
    
I'm assuming I will want to do this when using pop_back() or erase(), yes? –  Gaffi Mar 6 '12 at 13:41
    
Thanks for the follow-up edit. I missed it earlier! –  Gaffi Mar 7 '12 at 0:39

You might probably need to change the line containing the while statement:

while(iter != allMovers.end()) {

the < operator seems to work fine with a vector usually, but I had better results using != which works with other containers and also seems to be used in more example code out there.


Update

You may replace the while loop with an equivalent for loop like this:

for(std::vector<Mover>::iterator iter = allMovers.begin(); iter != allMovers.end(); ++iter)
{

This has the advantage that the increment of the iterator iter "has its place" and is less likely to be forgotten.


Update 2

If I understand your example above, you'd like to fill the container with some content. I suggest (as others did) to get rid of the iterator altogether.

int main() 
{
    std::vector< Mover > allMovers;

    //Other code

    while(1) // this loop will add new movers as long as it succeeds to create one
    {
        Mover new_mover = CreateNewMover();
        if ( IS EMPTY (new_mover) )  // pseudocode. Check if the previous
             break;                  // CreateNewMover() succeeded.

        allMovers.push_back(new_mover); 
    }

    //Other code
}
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I have seen this idea before, and I probably should switch over. However, it looks like the better solution for me, given other answers, it to avoid using the iterator altogether. Thanks! –  Gaffi Mar 6 '12 at 13:11
    
Right, I do want to change the vector, so the iterator is not the right option. I've already changed over the code to use an index, and it works great! –  Gaffi Mar 7 '12 at 10:38

You are (probably) doing it wrong.

The thing is, mixing iteration over a container and manipulation of the container structure (here adding objects) is extremely error-prone.

Whenever you add an element in allMovers, there is a risk that iter is invalidated. Any usage of iter after it has been invalidated is Undefined Behavior.

It is possible to do it correctly:

iter = allMovers.insert(allMovers.end(), CreateNewMover());

however it's just a bad idea in general.

My advice would be to ban this kind of code from your code base altogether. Every single occurrence is a bug in the making. Find another algorithm.

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While this is basically my accepted answer. @Mike Seymour provided the little extra bit of using the index. Thanks, though! –  Gaffi Mar 6 '12 at 13:13
1  
insert will return an iterator pointing to the inserted element, which isn't what's wanted here. I think the only way to preserve iter is to convert it to an index before insertion; in which case, you're might as well use an index (or a different container). –  Mike Seymour Mar 6 '12 at 13:20
1  
@MikeSeymour: I don't know what the use case is since all the code has been hidden in the question :) Still I agree that in this cases indexes will work better (or using a deque to avoid relocation) however it is particular to this usecase and I prefer to just avoid this kind of error-prone construct altogether. –  Matthieu M. Mar 6 '12 at 13:28

From documentation for push_back():

If new size() is not larger than capacity(), no iterators or references are invalidated. Otherwise all iterators and references are invalidated.

When you reach 30 or some objects new size() > capacity(), resulting in invalidation of the iterator iter, which is derefenced causing undefined behaviour.

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This code is simply bad! Constructs like

Initialize iter;
while (Iterate over the container) {
  Do something with iter;
  Modify the container itself;
  ++iter;
}

This makes no sense to me unless the iter is reassigned to the new location (like while doing vector erasures) and would get invalidated in a variety of ways. To force this to make it work seems like a bad idea and for all I know, it can be easily refactored into a cleaner implementation.

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