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I'm a bit mixed up. Here is my work so far.

public class CourseYear
{
    private String courseName;
    private int year;
    private String tutorName;
    private String [] moduleList;

The moduleList is to hold 6 modules

public CourseYear()
{
    courseName = "Default";
    year = 0;
    tutorName = "Joe Bloggs";
    moduleList = new String [5];
}

This is where my problem lies, I'm not sure how to do the array parts:

public void addModule(Module newModule, int index)
{
    Module = newModule[0];
    Module = newModule[1];
    Module = newModule[2];
    Module = newModule[3];
    Module = newModule[4];
    Module = newModule[5];
}

I have no idea how to do the get methods

public Module getModule(int index)
{
    return Module[index];
}
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if this is homework please tag it as such –  hvgotcodes Mar 6 '12 at 14:05
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you need to reference your array with the index. In your class definition you need a

private Module[] modules = new Module[6]; // initialize

If you want your Array to contain Module instances, the array needs to be an array of Modules. Right now your class has a String array.

and then your add method becomes

public void addModule(Module newModule, int index){
    this.modules[index] = newModule; // put the instance in the correct bucket
}

Note a few things:

1). Your array has 6 buckets, so the indexes allowed are 0-5. If index in the addModule method is out of bounds you will get an exception.

2). addModule expects newModule to be a module instance. So you use addModule like

CourseYear courseYear = new CourseYear(); // create a courseyear
courseYear.addModule(new Module(), 0); // create a module and add it at index 0
courseYear.addModule(new Module(), 1); // create a module and add it at index 1
...

You can also use addModule inside the CourseYear class. Say you want to initialize in your constructor

public CourseYear(){
    this.addModule(new Module(), 0); // create a module and add it at index 0
    this.addModule(new Module(), 1); // create a module and add it at index 1
    ...
}

You should be able to figure out getModule

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Thank you very much. This was really helpful –  joe Mar 6 '12 at 18:37
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    public class CourseYear
    {
        private String courseName;
        private int year;
        private String tutorName;
        private Module[] moduleList;

    public CourseYear()
    {
        courseName = "Default";
        year = 0;
        tutorName = "Joe Bloggs";
        moduleList = new Module[6];
    }

    public void addModule(Module newModule, int index)
    {
        moduleList[index] = newModule;
    }


    public Module getModule(int index)
    {
        return moduleList[index];
    }
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Two things.

1.If you want to hold 6 values in moduleList, you should instantiate with new String[6].

2.You will simplify your life by using an object of type List<String> instead of having to maintain an index and so forth:

 List<String> moduleList = new ArrayList<String>();

It's dynamic and simple to use.

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I assume you wanted to write get and set methods for moduleList. The signatures would be

public void setModuleList(String[] module);

public String[] getModuleList();

Once you get the list, you can retrieve the items in the list.

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