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I ran the below with g++ -std=c++0x pod_test.cpp on g++ 4.6.2 (mingw). I get an error on A4. Why isn't A4 POD?

#include <iostream>
#include <new>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

struct A {
    int a, b;
    char c;
};
struct A2 {
    short buf[1];
};
struct A3:A {
};
struct A4:A {
    short buf[1];
};
static_assert(std::is_pod<A>::value, "Struct must be a POD type");
static_assert(std::is_pod<A2>::value, "Struct must be a POD type");
static_assert(std::is_pod<A3>::value, "Struct must be a POD type");
static_assert(std::is_pod<A4>::value, "Struct must be a POD type");

int main(){}
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1 Answer

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It's not POD because it breaks this rule for standard layout classes:

— either has no non-static data members in the most derived class and at most one base class with non-static data members, or has no base classes with non-static data members

Only one class in the inheritance lattice can have non-static data members. In this case, both A and A4 have.

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there is at most one base class with non-static data members. In all examples. How does this rule apply? –  Mordachai Mar 6 '12 at 14:46
1  
"has no non-static data members in the most derived class and at most one base class with non-static data members". A4 has non-static data members. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 6 '12 at 14:47
    
I think i linked that to you. I remember its sect 7 -lookups- ok 9.0.7. Accept when i can. I overlooked the ',' before the or. No wonder why 'either' made no sense. –  acidzombie24 Mar 6 '12 at 14:47
1  
@Mordachai: "no non-static data members in most derived class and at most one base class with non-static data members". –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 6 '12 at 14:47
    
Hmm, I also didn't realize that you essentially can't use inheritence. The committee dropped the ball on standard layout types then -- it's of no more use than the old POD definition. Here's to another 10 years coding standards non-compliant structures. :( –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 6 '12 at 15:45
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