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In order to represent the method that executes on a thread I am using ParameterizedThreadStart and passing the name of the method. In this case the method name is SelectJob and the instantiation is as follows:

ParameterizedThreadStart starter = new ParameterizedThreadStart(SelectJob);

protected void SelectJob(object index)
{
     ...
}

In order to reuse a portion of code I would like, if possible, to store the method name in a variable but the IntelliSense shows the method signature for ParameterizedThreadStart as ParameterizedThreadStart(void (object) target) and I'm not sure how I could store this sort of value. From MSDN I realize this is a delegate so after reading How to: Declare, Instantiate, and Use a Delegate I tried to declare ...

delegate void Del(string str);
Del selectDelegate = SelectJob;

... but since the SelectJob method is not static I am not able to do this. Simply making the method static is not an easy option.

Is there another way of making this declaration?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Initialise the delegate instance inside a constructor?

public class MyClass
{
    private ParameterizedThreadStart starter;

    public MyClass()
    {
        starter = SelectJob;

        Del selectDelegate = SelectJob;
    }

    delegate void Del(string str);

    protected void SelectJob(object index)
    {

    }
}
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Thank you. I rarely look into the use of delegates and, while not conceptually difficult, I often struggle to instantiate them correctly. Thank you for the help! –  McArthey Mar 8 '12 at 15:52
    
You are welcome. –  Simon Whittemore Mar 8 '12 at 15:54

You can just assign it to an Action field in your constructor:

   class Boo
    {
        public Boo()
        {
            _myDelegate = SelectJob;

        }

        Action<object> _myDelegate ;
        protected void SelectJob(object index)
        {

        }
    }

Alternatively, have a method that always returns your delegate:

   class Hoo
    {


        protected Action<object> SelectJobDelegate(object index)
        {
            return o =>
                       {

                           // do something with o
                       };
        }
    }
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