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I have a simple table comments (id INT, revision INT, comment VARCHAR(140)) with some content like this:

1|1|hallo1|
1|2|hallo2|
1|3|hallo3|
2|1|hallo1|
2|2|hallo2|

I'm searching for an SQL statement which will return each comment with the highest revision:

1|3|hallo3|
2|2|hallo2|

I've come up with this solution:

select id, revision, comment 
  from comments 
  where revision = (
      select max(revision) 
        from comments as f 
        where f.id = comments.id
  );

but it is very slow on large data sets. Are there any better queries to accomplish this?

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could you consider renaming the topic to reflect optimization or performance? –  hometoast Sep 22 '08 at 16:58

8 Answers 8

Here's one way that with appropriate indexing will not be heinously slow and it doesn't use a subselect:

SELECT comments.ID, comments.revision, comments.comment FROM comments 
LEFT OUTER JOIN comments AS maxcomments 
ON maxcomments.ID= comments.ID
AND maxcomments.revision > comments.revision
WHERE maxcomments.revision IS NULL

Adapted from queries here: http://www.xaprb.com/blog/2007/03/14/how-to-find-the-max-row-per-group-in-sql-without-subqueries/

(From google search: max group by sql)

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  1. Make sure you have your indexes set up appropriately. Indexing on id, revision would be good.

  2. Here's a different take on your query. Haven't checked its execution plan, but if you set up the index well it should help:

    SELECT c.* 
      FROM comments c
      INNER JOIN (
            SELECT id,max(revision) AS maxrev 
              FROM comments 
              GROUP BY id
      ) b
        ON c.id=b.id AND c.revision=b.maxrev
    

Editted to add:

  1. If you're on SQL Server, you might want to check out Indexed Views as well:
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/sql/2005/impprfiv.mspx

Editted again to add info:

Subquery:
25157 records
2 seconds
Execution plan includes an Index Seek (82%) base and a Segment (17%)

Left Outer Join:
25160 records
3 seconds
Execution plan includes two Index Scans @ 22% each with a Right Outer Merge at 45% and a Filter at 11%

I'd still go with the sub query.

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Tested with one of our tables that has nearly 1 million rows total. Indexes exist on both fields FIELD2 AND FIELD3. Query returned 83953 rows in under 3 seconds on our dev box.

select
FIELD1, FIELD2, FIELD3
from
OURTABLE (nolock) T1
WHERE FIELD3 = 
(
SELECT MAX(FIELD3) FROM 
OURTABLE T2 (nolock)
WHERE T1.FIELD2=T2.FIELD2
)
ORDER BY FIELD2 DESC
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Idea from left field, but what about adding an extra field to the table:

CurrentRevision bit not null

Then when you make a change, set the flag on the new revision and remove it on all previous ones.

Your query would then simply become:

select  Id,
        Comment
from    Comments
where   CurrentRevision = 1

This would be much easier on the database and therefore much faster.

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One quite clean way to do "latest x by id" type queries is this. It should also be quite easy to index properly.

SELECT id, revision, comment 
FROM comments
WHERE (id, revision) IN (
  SELECT id, MAX(revision)
  FROM comments
  -- WHERE clause comes here if needed
  GROUP BY id
)
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For big tables I find that this solution can has a better performance:

    SELECT c1.id, 
           c1.revision, 
           c1.comment 
      FROM comments c1 
INNER JOIN ( SELECT id, 
                max(revision) AS max_revision
               FROM comments 
           GROUP BY id ) c2
        ON c1.id = c2.id
       AND c1.revision = c2.max_revision
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Analytics would be my recommendation.

select id, max_revision, comment
from (select c.id, c.comment, c.revision, max(c.revision)over(partition by c.id) as max_revision
      from comments c)
where revision = max_revision;
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Without subselects (or temporary tables):

SELECT c1.ID, c1.revision, c1.comment 
FROM comments AS c1
LEFT JOIN comments AS c2 
    ON c1.ID = c2.ID
    AND c1.revision < c2.revision
WHERE c2.revision IS NULL
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