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I was wondering about Javascript performance about using string.replace() or string.substr(). Let me explain what I'm doing.

I've a string like

str = "a.aa.a.aa."

I just have to "pop" last element in str where I always know what type of character it is (e.g, it's a dot here).

It's so simple, I can follow a lot of ways, like

str = str.substr(0, str.length-1) // same as using slice()

or

str = str.replace(/\.$/, '')

Which methods would you use? Why? Is there some lack in performance using this or that method? Length of the string is negligible.

(this is my first post, so if I'm doing something wrong please, notify me!)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For performance tests in JavaScript use jsPerf.com

I created a testcase for your question here, which shows, that substr is a lot faster (at least in firefox).

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Just to chime in, I did the same, except I added in slice(0, -1) (which was slower). Logically, it's worth adding that we should expect a regular expression to be slower because at the very least it's adding in the step of testing parts of the string for matches. –  brymck Mar 6 '12 at 15:46
    
So cool! I forgot about [jsperf.com](jsPerf.com), I used it sometime ago. Anyway, thanks for the reply! –  Finalfire Mar 6 '12 at 17:09

If you just want the last character in the string, then use the subscript, not some replacement:

str[str.length-1]
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Yeah I know but I have to modify the string, not only read last element. –  Finalfire Mar 6 '12 at 17:12

Do you have to do this thousands of times in a loop? If not (and "Length of string is negligible"), any way will do.

That said, I'd prefer the first option, since it makes the intention of trimming the last character more clear than the second one (oh, and it's faster, in case you do need to run this a zillion times. Since in the regex case, you need to not only build a new string but also compile a RegExp and run it against the input.)

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Not faster. –  Florian Margaine Mar 6 '12 at 15:43
    
@FlorianMargaine: amazing. For the regex solution, JS VM has to compile the regex, run it against the input string and build a new string. For the substr() solution, only building a new string is necessary. See Sirko's answer. –  Alexander Pavlov Mar 6 '12 at 15:46
    
My bad, I was actually wrong (thank god! regex are still slow.). You need to edit the answer so that I can un-downvote it, though. –  Florian Margaine Mar 6 '12 at 15:57
    
@FlorianMargaine: thanks Florian! –  Alexander Pavlov Mar 6 '12 at 15:59
    
Sincerely I have to do it only one time in a row. Anyway, prefer to use first option too :) Thanks for reply. –  Finalfire Mar 6 '12 at 17:11

When you have this kind of doubt, either pick what you like the best (style-speaking, as running this only once doesn't matter much), or use http://jsperf.com.

For this very example, see here why substr is better :-).

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The substr way should always be faster than any kind of RegExp. But the performance difference should be minor.

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Clearly, not. Regex are surprisingly fast nowadays. –  Florian Margaine Mar 6 '12 at 15:43
    
Well just look at the jsPerf.com link by Sirko, it clearly shows that substr is faster... –  xato Mar 6 '12 at 15:45
    
Okay this is weird. Your posted jsPerf link is cleary in favor of regex, but Sirko's favors substr. –  xato Mar 6 '12 at 15:48
    
@xato take a close look: the names are switched in Florian's testcase –  Sirko Mar 6 '12 at 15:53
    
My bad. I'm feeling quite stupid, there. Edit your question so that I can un-downvote it :-) –  Florian Margaine Mar 6 '12 at 15:55

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