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In php we can create standard classes and objes like this

< ?php 

$car = new stdClass;
$car->Colour = 'black';
$car->type = 'sports';

print_r($car);
?>

is there any similar way in C#.net ??? I'm very new to C# anyone can help???

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2  
What do you want to get? I mean, write the pseudo-C# you would like to write. –  Adriano Repetti Mar 6 '12 at 15:53
    
You can use Anonymous Types –  Anurag Ranjhan Mar 6 '12 at 15:54
    
What version of the .net framework are you using in your project? There are some neat things in .net 4.0 that could help you, but it's also possible to do it in 3.5. –  Brendon Dugan Mar 6 '12 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use Anonymous Types in C#, e.g.: taken from the link:

var v = new { Amount = 108, Message = "Hello" };
    Console.WriteLine(v.Amount + v.Message);

Note the Remarks section for their limitations (e.g. can only be cast to object) etc.

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C# is statically typed, so regular classes must be declared before they can be used. However, anonymous types allow you to declare classes based on initialization. Once declared neither the type nor the instance can be changed though.

For a more dynamic approach take a look at ExpandoObject which allows dynamically adding properties. This requires C# 4 and the reference must be declared as dynamic.

dynamic car = new ExpandoObject();
car.Color = "Black";
car.Type "Sports";
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You can use anonymous types, but they aren't quite the same: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397696.aspx

C# is really all about strong-typing, so weak-type support is, well, pretty weak. Depending on what you're actually doing here, an anonymous type might work, but in general you should create real classes when coding in C#. For your Car example above, I would usually create a class. It's more code, but that's the way C# is. PHP you might create an app with, say, 10 PHP files, but the same C# app will probably end up being 20-30.

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