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Yeah, sorry about asking a stupid n00b question. So I have a C# program. I have a class

class foo
{

    public int bar, wee, someotherint, someyetanotherint;

    public foo()
    {
         this.bar = 1:
         this.wee = 12;
         this.someotherint = 1231;
         this.someyetanotherint = 443;
    }
}

And I want to make a class called spleen that inherits from foo

class spleen : foo
{

}

What is the quickest, easiest syntax to make the class spleen inherit the constructor from foo without having to copy/paste the entire constructor from foo? I don't want to hear that I already have too many parameters. I already know that. (edit: Actually, no. I'm an idiot) I know I should probably somehow call the parent constructor, but I don't know how. How do I do that.

Edit: I realize now that I should have taken more time to write my question. It looks like I was trying to ask two questions at the same time without realizing it (how to inherit constructors with no parameters, and how to inherit constructors with parameters) , and somehow jumbled it all up. However the answers provided were very helpful and solved my problem. Thanks, and sorry for being such an idiot!

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It sounds like you may be confused on the verbiage... you're not inheriting from Spleen, you're inheriting from Foo - this makes Foo the base class and Spleen the subclass –  John Rasch Jun 6 '09 at 1:22
1  
Also note that the 'foo' constructor in your question currently does not have any parameters. Parameterless constructors and chaining between them you get 'for free' in C#, so as written in your question, 'spleen' does exactly what you want. –  jerryjvl Jun 6 '09 at 1:40
    
Why do you say you have "too many parameters"? After your edit, you don't have any parameters at all. (At which point, you don't need to do anything to spleen. The code you show will compile just fine and work as expected.) –  Joe White Jun 6 '09 at 1:42
    
BTW, the .NET convention is to name classes in PascalCase, so if you want your code to fit in with others', you may want to capitalize your class names. –  Joe White Jun 6 '09 at 1:43
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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is the base keyword. You can use it to call into the base constructor and provide the necessary arguments.

Try the following. I picked 0 as a default for lack of a better option

class spleen : foo { 
  public spleen() : base(0,0,0,0)
  {
  }
}

EDIT

Based on your new version of the code, the simplest way to call the constructor is to quite literally do nothing. The default constructor generated for spleen will automatically call the base empty constructor of foo.

class spleen : foo { 
  public spleen() {}
}
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2  
And this spleen class doesn't even need a constructor - just declaring the class to inherit from foo will automatically call the default constructor of the base class. –  Jeremy McGee Jun 6 '09 at 9:19
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You just create it, and call the base constructor:

public spleen(int bar, int wee, int someotherint, int someyetanotherint)
    : base(bar,wee,someotherint,someyetanotherint)
{
    // Do any spleen specific stuff here
}
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JaredPar is right but missed something and I don't have enough rep to edit it.

class spleen : foo 
{
     public spleen() : base()
}

If you parent class took in parameter in the constructor then it would be

class foo
{

     public int bar, wee, someotherint, someyetanotherint;

     public foo(int bar, int wee, int someotherint, int someyetanotherint)
     {
           this.bar = bar;
           this.wee = wee;
           this.someotherint = someotherint;
           this.someyetanotherint = someyetanotherint;

     }
}

class spleen : foo 
{
     public spleen(int bar, 
                   int wee, 
                   int someotherint, 
                   int someyetanotherint) : base(bar, 
                                                 wee, 
                                                 someotherint,  
                                                 someyetanotherint)
}
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Hmm, looks like the user editted the question. My answer matches the original version of the question. You're correct on the updated one though. –  JaredPar Jun 6 '09 at 1:51
    
Yeah I just looked at the revisions and you had it the first time. –  Kyle Sonaty Jun 6 '09 at 2:31
    
and you get my up vote. –  Kyle Sonaty Jun 6 '09 at 2:32
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Make the constructor protected:

protected Operator(String s, int i, boolean flag){
    operator = s;
    precedenceLevel = i;
    associative = flag;
}

//stuff

class MulOperator extends Operator {
protected MulOperator(String s, int precedenceLevel, boolean flag) {
    super(s, precedenceLevel, flag);
}

so on and so forth

EDIT: Assuming they have the same/similar constructor...

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The constructors of the base class do not need to be protected. Any public or protected constructor may be called by a child class in C#. –  jrista Jun 6 '09 at 1:27
    
Either are acceptable, I presented one of the options... –  Knowles Atchison Jun 6 '09 at 3:43
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