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Working off an idea from the Big Nerd Ranch guide to iOS programming, I'm trying to define singleton object in the following manner:

@implementation ImageStore

static ImageStore *defaultImageStore = nil;

- (id)init
{
    if (defaultImageStore) {
        return defaultImageStore;
    }

    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        dictionary = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    }

    NSNotificationCenter *notificationCenter = [NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter];
    [notificationCenter addObserver:self selector:@selector(clearCache) name:UIApplicationDidReceiveMemoryWarningNotification object:nil];

    return self;
}

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    return [self defaultImageStore];
}

+ (ImageStore *)defaultImageStore
{
    if (!defaultImageStore) {
        defaultImageStore = [[super allocWithZone:NULL] init];
    }
    return defaultImageStore;
}

This works fine, but the analyzer complains about allocWithZone, saying

Object with +0 retain counts returned to caller where a +1 (owning) retain count is expected

I think the code is just tricking the analyzer and that what's happening is OK, but is there a better model to do what I'm trying to do?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't bother with all that stuff. This is my pattern:

@implementation MyClass

-(id) init { ... } /* normal init */

+(MyClass*) defaultMyClass
{
    static MyClass* theObject = nil;
    @synchronized([MyClass class])  // remove synchronzed block in single threaded app
    {
        if (theObject == nil)
        {
            theObject = [[self alloc] init];
        }
    }
    return theObject;
}

Possbily you can hide the initialiser in a class extension so that it is documented that you shouldn't use it.

There's also the GCD method (the below is stolen from Rob Napier's link) which is actually more lightweight.

+ (id) defaultMyClass
{
    static dispatch_once_t pred;
    static MyClass* theObject = nil;

    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{ theObject = [[self alloc] init]; });
    return theObject;
}

I've always resisted the GCD pattern because to my eye it looks less obvious what is happening. However, that's nothing that can't be fixed with a comment! The locks used by GCD are more lightweight in comparison to @synchronized, so this will be faster.

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Given the extra steps involved with my method, yours does seem a lot more straightforward... –  Ben Flynn Mar 6 '12 at 17:20
2  
As a general rule, if you're overriding +alloc, you're doing something wrong. I know that Apple posted code explaining how to do it (they weren't actually recommending the pattern; just explaining it). That page has probably sent more developers down the wrong road than any other document in Cocoa. JeremyP's solution is one of many. The best today (and the one that Apple recommends at WWDC) is probably the GCD singleton: adamhuda.com/creating-a-singleton-with-gcd –  Rob Napier Mar 6 '12 at 17:24
    
Apple does seem to at least implicitly recommend the pattern I'm using here developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… The difference being that they call retain in allocWithZone. –  Ben Flynn Mar 6 '12 at 17:49
    
There's also the new fancy way of accessing singleton objects using dispatch_once(), if you want to get your hands dirty with GCD :) –  Jack Lawrence Mar 6 '12 at 23:16
1  
Create a private init method (initSingleton). Then in init call NSAssert() and return nil. This will ensure that you do not accidentally try to create a unique instance, turning it into a programming error (assertion). Most of the time, however, there is no need to enforce uniqueness. Look at NSNotificationCenter. You're free to create multiple centers if you like, and there are even reasons to do so (rare, but sometimes). As JeremyP notes, this also makes mocking easier for testing. Don't force uniqueness if it's not really required. –  Rob Napier Mar 7 '12 at 22:42

As I mentioned in a comment, solving the compiler warning was as simple as adding a retain to the statement, which is mentioned in an Apple doc.

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    return [[self defaultImageStore] retain];
}

Side note: I hadn't mentioned this, but I am developing for iOS, and found that the dispatch_once method seem to halt my app's execution.

share|improve this answer
    
dispatch_once() is the correct solution on iOS. If it's halting, then you have a bug. –  Rob Napier Mar 7 '12 at 13:55
    
I will try that sometime. For now this works (retain is a no-op for defaultImageStore, but it makes the analyzer happy). –  Ben Flynn Mar 7 '12 at 14:00
    
I think I hadn't removed all of the code from the method I was using before when I tried dispatch_once. Works great. –  Ben Flynn Mar 23 '12 at 20:30

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