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I have a C# code which is working good when the "optimize code" option is off, but fails otherwise. Is there any function or class attribute which can prevent the optimisation of a function or class, but let the compiler optimize the others ?

(I tried unsafe or MethodImpl, but without success)

Thanks

Edit : I have done some more test... The code is like this :

double arg = (Math.PI / 2d - Math.Atan2(a, d)); 

With a = 1 and d = 0, arg should be 0. Thid code is a function which is called by Excel via ExcelDNA.

Calling an identical code from an optimized console app : OK

Calling this code from Excel without optimization : OK

Calling this code from Excel with optimization : Not OK, arg == 0 is false (instead arg is a very small value near 0, but not 0)

Same result with [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoOptimization)] before the called function.

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1  
What do you mean it "fails"? Do you get an exception, is it performing slowly or something else? The functionality of your code shouldn't change when it's optimized. –  Botz3000 Mar 6 '12 at 17:26
6  
If it fails when optimizations are enabled, then it's probably wrong... Post the code please! –  Thomas Levesque Mar 6 '12 at 17:31
    
If you've tried MethodImpl.NoOptimization and it's still failing, I doubt your problem is optimization (which I would doubt it would be anyway), it's something else. Post some code. –  Christopher Currens Mar 6 '12 at 17:50
    
Try using decimal instead of double. –  jumpingcode Mar 6 '12 at 18:02
    
I don't think using decimals is a good idea, the args passed by Excel are double and it is the same for the ones of atan2. –  Poca Mar 7 '12 at 8:39

2 Answers 2

This is very likely to do with the floating point mode which Excel likely has set - meaning that your program is calculating floating points slightly different because of the program (Excel) hosting your assembly (DLL). This might impact how your results are calculated, or how/what values are automatically coerced to zero.

To be absolutely sure you are not going to run into issues with different floating point modes and/or errors you should check for equality rather by checking if the values are very close together. This is not really a hack.

public class AlmostDoubleComparer : IComparer<double>
{
    public static readonly AlmostDoubleComparer Default = new AlmostDoubleComparer();
    public const double Epsilon = double.Epsilon * 64d; // 0.{322 zeroes}316

    public static bool IsZero(double x)
    {
        return Compare(x, 0) == 0;
    }

    public static int Compare(double x, double y)
    {
        // Very important that cmp(x, y) == cmp(y, x)
        if (Double.IsNaN(x) || Double.IsNaN(y))
            return 1;
        if (Double.IsInfinity(x) || Double.IsInfinity(y))
            return 1;

        var absX = Math.Abs(x);
        var absY = Math.Abs(y);
        var diff = absX > absY ? absX - absY : absY - absX;
        if (diff < Epsilon)
            return 0;
        if (x < y)
            return -1;
        else
            return 1;
    }

    int IComparer<double>.Compare(double x, double y)
    {
        return Compare(x, y);
    }
}

// E.g.
double arg = (Math.PI / 2d - Math.Atan2(a, d));
if (AlmostDoubleComparer.IsZero(arg))
   // Regard it as zero.

I also ported the re-interpret integer comparison, in case you find that more suitable (it deals with larger values more consistently).

public class AlmostDoubleComparer : IComparer<double>
{
    public static readonly AlmostDoubleComparer Default = new AlmostDoubleComparer();
    public const double MaxUnitsInTheLastPlace = 3;

    public static bool IsZero(double x)
    {
        return Compare(x, 0) == 0;
    }

    public static int Compare(double x, double y)
    {
        // Very important that cmp(x, y) == cmp(y, x)
        if (Double.IsNaN(x) || Double.IsNaN(y))
            return 1;
        if (Double.IsInfinity(x) || Double.IsInfinity(y))
            return 1;

        var ix = DoubleInt64.Reinterpret(x);
        var iy = DoubleInt64.Reinterpret(y);
        var diff = Math.Abs(ix - iy);
        if (diff < MaxUnitsInTheLastPlace)
            return 0;

        if (ix < iy)
            return -1;
        else
            return 1;
    }

    int IComparer<double>.Compare(double x, double y)
    {
        return Compare(x, y);
    }
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct DoubleInt64
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private double _double;
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    private long _int64;

    private DoubleInt64(long value)
    {
        _double = 0d;
        _int64 = value;
    }

    private DoubleInt64(double value)
    {
        _int64 = 0;
        _double = value;
    }

    public static double Reinterpret(long value)
    {
        return new DoubleInt64(value)._double;
    }

    public static long Reinterpret(double value)
    {
        return new DoubleInt64(value)._int64;
    }
}

Alternatively you could try and NGen the assembly and see if you can work around the either the mode Excel has, or how it is hosting the CLR.

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"This is very likely to do with the floating point mode which Excel likely has set" => thanks for the link, I will check that. –  Poca Mar 7 '12 at 8:42
1  
@Poca remember that if you change it back to what you are expecting (I am not sure what is the default anyway) you might mess with Excel - so it's best to do the 'closeness' checks. –  Jonathan Dickinson Mar 7 '12 at 9:31

That is what you get when working with floating point datatypes. You don't get exactly 0, but a very close value, since a double has limited precision and not every value can be represented and sometimes those tiny precision errors add up. You either need to expect that (check that the value is close enough to 0).

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I don't think using decimal or int together with Math.Atan2 makes sense. And using decimal won't magically give you infinite precision, it just lets you represent decimal fractions exactly. –  svick Mar 6 '12 at 18:25
    
When did i say decimal would offer infinite precision? Also it all depends on what he wants to do with it. The result is a quite small value, and you can't do anything about the imprecision. Comparing a double to constant values like 0 often leads to such bugs. –  Botz3000 Mar 6 '12 at 18:35
    
Yes, using double leads to such bugs. But how does using decimal help? –  svick Mar 6 '12 at 19:12
1  
It minimizes rounding errors, but you are right, it probably wouldn't help in this case. –  Botz3000 Mar 6 '12 at 19:24
    
"You don't get exactly 0, but a very close value" => ok, but why when called from Excel with optim on, arg == 0 is false, and when optim are off, arg == 0 is true for the same parameters ? –  Poca Mar 7 '12 at 8:41

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