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The snippet below works. However, it's a bit ugly because it uses a static method to wrap a method call to a predicate.

In other words, I would like to replace:

c.remove_if_true( Value::IsOdd );   // static method

with something like

c.remove_if_true( Value::isOdd );   // member method

There should be one fewer level of indirection and hopefully, the resultant code would be clearer.

How do I refactor my code to call isOdd() directly without having to go through a static method wrapper?

However, if this implementation is as clear as I can make this code, also let me know. TIA.

#include <vector>
#include <functional>

template< typename T >
class MyContainer
{
public:
    typedef std::function<bool(const T& t)>   PREDICATE;

public:
    void remove_if_true( PREDICATE predicate )
    {
        // NOTE: use implementation from KennyTM's answer below
    }
private:
    std::vector< T >  m_vec;
};

class Value
{
public:
    Value( int i ) : m_i( i ) { }
    bool isOdd() const { return m_i%2==1; }
    static bool IsOdd( const Value& v ) { return v.isOdd(); }
private:
    int m_i;
};


int main()
{
    MyContainer<Value> c;

    c.remove_if_true( Value::IsOdd );  // would like to replace with Value::isOdd here
}

Solution using KennyTM's Answer

ataylor's suggestion std::mem_fun_ref() required with gcc 4.6.1 and other compilers not completely up-to-date with latest standards

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

template< typename T >
class MyContainer
{
public:
    typedef std::const_mem_fun_ref_t<bool, T>  PREDICATE;

public:
    void remove_if( PREDICATE predicate )
    {
        auto old_end = m_vec.end();
        auto new_end = std::remove_if(m_vec.begin(), old_end, predicate);
        m_vec.erase(new_end, old_end);
    }
private:
    std::vector< T >  m_vec;
};

class Value
{
public:
    Value( int i ) : m_i( i ) { }
    bool isOdd() const { return m_i%2==1; }
private:
    int m_i;
};


int main()
{
    MyContainer<Value> c;

    c.remove_if( std::mem_fun_ref( &Value::isOdd ));
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
c.remove_if_true( std::mem_fn(&Value::isOdd) );

BTW, is there any reason you need to avoid std::remove_if?

void remove_if_true(PREDICATE predicate)
{
    auto old_end = m_vec.end();
    auto new_end = std::remove_if(m_vec.begin(), old_end, predicate);
    m_vec.erase(new_end, old_end);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 excellent point about remove_if() - it replaces my entire internal implementation for remove_if_true... ...but what does the typedef for my PREDICATE become with your answer? – kfmfe04 Mar 6 '12 at 18:09
1  
Regarding the first part: The definition of PREDICATE uses a reference instead of a pointer, so std::mem_fn_ref is needed instead of std::mem_fn – ataylor Mar 6 '12 at 18:17
    
+1 @ataylor - tyvm - that's the very last part that I couldn't figure out – kfmfe04 Mar 6 '12 at 18:19
1  
@ataylor: No it works for const references. See C++11 §20.8.2[func.require]/1 yourself. std::mem_fun_ref (§D.8.2.2[depr.member.pointer.adaptors]/7) has been deprecated, and all use cases can be supported by std::bind or std::mem_fn. – kennytm Mar 6 '12 at 18:48
1  
@KennyTM I stand corrected. However, my compiler does require std::mem_fun_ref at the moment – ataylor Mar 6 '12 at 19:02

c.remove_if_true( std::bind( &Value::isOdd, _1 ) );

share|improve this answer
    
how does that work without an Value instance? – juanchopanza Mar 6 '12 at 18:04
    
The _1 is a placeholder for the Value instance. – CashCow Mar 6 '12 at 18:09
    
But where does the instance come from? I can only get this to work: std::bind(&Value::isOdd, Value(), _1); – juanchopanza Mar 6 '12 at 18:20
1  
@juanchopanza: Try to add using std::placeholders::_1; somewhere. – kennytm Mar 6 '12 at 20:52
    
@KennyTM Yes, I got that. As I said, std::bind(&Value::isOdd, Value(), _1) works for me, std::bind(&Value::isOdd, _1) does not. My understanding is that it shouldn't work. – juanchopanza Mar 6 '12 at 21:40

You can use std::mem_fn_ref to wrap isOdd:

c.remove_if_true( std::mem_fun_ref(&Value::isOdd) );
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - ty for adding the comment above - I almost missed your answer in the flurry of responses... – kfmfe04 Mar 6 '12 at 18:24

Best way use lambdas :

c.remove_if_true( [] (const Value & v) { return v.get() % 2 == 0; } );

Or more self-commented :

auto isOdd = [] (const Value & v) { return v.get() % 2 == 0; };
c.remove_if_true( isOdd );
share|improve this answer
    
the lambda would be a good solution if the class has a get() member function and not an isOdd() member function. In that case you don't want to "intrude" on your Value class by having to give it a method for the purpose of the operation you want to do on it, and you don't have to start creating named functions or functors for it. – CashCow Mar 6 '12 at 18:12
    
@CashCow: You can always call Value::isOdd from the lambda: [](const Value &v) {return v.isOdd();}. Of course std::mem_fn is probably a cleaner solution in this particular case... – Andreas Magnusson Mar 6 '12 at 18:56
    
isOdd? Really? – ildjarn Mar 7 '12 at 3:00

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