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I was just wondering what is the best way to do this. At the moment I have declared the CancellationTokenSource in the GUI namespace so I can invoke it when a button is pressed.

namespace Namespace1
{
    public class Number1
    { 
    CancellationTokenSource cancelToken = new CancellationTokenSource();
    ....

and I have then written a constructor that accepts a CancellationTokenSource parameter and assigns it to a locally declared field which I then use in my methods.

namespace Namespace2
{
    public class Number2
    {
        CancellationTokenSource cancelToken;

        public testing(CancellationTokenSource cancelToken)
        {
            this.cancelToken = cancelToken;
        }
        ... default constructor and method(s) follow.

Should I be writing this in a different way or is this ok?

share|improve this question
    
Does your current approach work as you expect (I know the code above won't)? –  M.Babcock Mar 6 '12 at 19:05
2  
Namespaces are a compile time concept - they do not exist at runtime. I'm still not sure, having read your narrative and seen your examples what specific problem you're having. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 6 '12 at 19:05
    
If you want to cancel something, you shouldn't give it CancellationTokenSource, just a CancellationToken. –  svick Mar 6 '12 at 19:14
1  
In addition, in general one piece of code should create a CancellationTokenSource object - everything else after that should just be accepting a CancellationToken. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 6 '12 at 19:16
    
Yes it seems to works correctly, but i havent seen an example similar to it which got me thinking i was doing something which was generally frowned upon. –  Hans Rudel Mar 6 '12 at 20:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Namespaces help you organize your code.

You will need to expose your CancellationTokenSource variable somehow. You can't just have a variable floating around outside the class definition.

I recommend you use a property. You can expose the CancellationTokenSource as a public property from an instance of the class, for example, so that other classes, even if they are in other namespaces, have access to it. Avoid using public variables.

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    namespace SomeOtherSpace
    {
        public class TokenWrapper
        {
            public CancellationToken CancelToken { get; set; }
        }
    }

    namespace YetAnotherSpace
    {
        public class AnotherClass
        {
            private readonly CancellationToken _Token;
            public AnotherClass(CancellationToken token)
            {
                _Token = token;
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            SomeOtherSpace.TokenWrapper wrapper = new SomeOtherSpace.TokenWrapper();
            wrapper.CancelToken = new CancellationToken();
            YetAnotherSpace.AnotherClass anotherClass = new YetAnotherSpace.AnotherClass(wrapper.CancelToken);
        }
    }
}

edit

In response to your comment, a better idea would be to have your could create one CancellationTokenSource, and then pass the CancellationToken around to classes that need to subscribe to it. It suits almost every scenario I can think of well.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    CancellationTokenSource sourceToken = new CancellationTokenSource();
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { MyTask(sourceToken.Token); });
}

static void MyTask(CancellationToken token)
{
    //do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
"You can't just have a variable floating around outside the class definition." i though i had it declared inside the class and that it was private by default? Is it possible to have it as a static property so i wouldnt have to pass an instance around? Thanks for your help, much appreciated –  Hans Rudel Mar 6 '12 at 20:15
    
@HansRudel: Updated my answer regarding your comment. –  Bryan Crosby Mar 7 '12 at 17:25
    
Duly noted, ill incorporate that into my project. Thanks very much for your help! –  Hans Rudel Mar 7 '12 at 17:42

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