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I am making application that will insert approx. 15 million records into a table and then build an index. It takes approx. 30 minutes to create the index (with the index optimization tips, such as NOLOGGING). I have the option to insert the data sorted by the same columns I will later build the index.

Will I gain any performance by doing so?

I am a Developer, not a DBA, so excuse me if this is an obvious answer.

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3 Answers 3

If you have the data already sorted, then when you create the index, you can tell Oracle that it doesn't need to sort the data again, using the NOSORT keyword.

CREATE INDEX index_name ON table_name (col1, col2) NOSORT;

SORT | NOSORT By default, Oracle Database sorts indexes in ascending order when it creates the index. You can specify NOSORT to indicate to the database that the rows are already stored in the database in ascending order, so that Oracle Database does not have to sort the rows when creating the index. If the rows of the indexed column or columns are not stored in ascending order, then the database returns an error. For greatest savings of sort time and space, use this clause immediately after the initial load of rows into a table. If you specify neither of these keywords, then SORT is the default.

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I'm not a DBA too, but i was curious and do the test (if someone thinks that my test is invalid, please let me to know).

I create the table

CREATE TABLE TEMP (
  ID_TEMP   NUMBER(10) NOT NULL,
  SOME_DATE  DATE NOT NULL,
  SOME_TEXT  VARCHAR2(60) NOT NULL,

  CONSTRAINT TEMP_PK primary key (ID_TEMP)

);

And then populate with random values

declare
  vdate date;
begin
  for idx in 0..10000000 loop
    vdate := sysdate - dbms_random.value(0,102548);
    insert into temp values(idx, vdate, 'something');
  end loop;
  commit;
end;

After that, the index:

create index TEMP_DATE_NDX ON TEMP (SOME_DATE) NOLOGGING; 
-- index TEMP_DATE_NDX created. Elapsed: 00:00:24.650

Then i droped the table and recreated, but this time I inserted the records in order:

DROP TABLE TEMP;
-- create table omitted...
declare
  vdate date;
begin
  for idx in 0..10000000 loop
    vdate := trunc(sysdate) + idx;
    insert into temp values(idx, vdate, 'something');
  end loop;
  commit;
end;

create index TEMP_DATE_NDX ON TEMP (SOME_DATE) NOLOGGING; 
-- index TEMP_DATE_NDX created. Elapsed: 00:00:01.993

As you can see, with any changes in the create index clause, the ordered data was faster.

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You probably will not gain any overall performance by doing this.

You'll lose more time sorting the table data than you'll gain from building the index. (Although things might be different if you're building multiple indexes.)

Sorting a table requires as much memory or temporary tablespace as the size of the entire table. I'm not sure about the internals of index building, but I would guess that Oracle only sorts the (much smaller) relevant data.

Since you're using multiple columns, you may want to look into index compression. Depending on your data, and the column order, it can save you a lot of time and space on the initial build.

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I am not sorting the data in oracle. My question was if I would gain by entering the records in a already sorted order. Will the index build quicker –  Jeffrey Mar 7 '12 at 14:27
    
But doesn't some system have to pay the price for that sorting? If not, then you might as well sort it. Sorting the table data will also decrease the clustering factor, which will likely make the index more efficient to use. And sorting the table data could also help with table compression, if you're using it. –  jonearles Mar 8 '12 at 0:04

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