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Usually, to discard changes to a file you would do

git checkout -- <file>

What if the change i want to discard is deleting the file? the above line would give an error:

error: pathspec '<file>' did not match any file(s) known to git.

What command will restore that single file without undoing other changes?

bonus point: Also, what if the change i want to discard is adding a file? i would like to know how to unstage that change as well.

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Discarding changes and unstaging are two different things, which are you trying to do? –  Andrew Marshall Mar 6 '12 at 20:35
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3 Answers 3

up vote 87 down vote accepted

Assuming you're wanting to undo the effects of 'git rm ' or 'rm ' followed by 'git add -A' or something similar:

# this restores the file status in the index
git reset -- <file>
# then check out a copy from the index
git checkout -- <file>

To undo 'git add ', the first line above suffices, assuming you haven't committed yet.

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Both questions are answered in git status.

To unstage adding a new file use git rm --cached

# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   test

To unstage deleting a file use git reset HEAD

# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   deleted:    test

In the other hand, git checkout -- never unstage, it just discards non-staged changes.

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The answers to your two questions are related. I'll start with the second:

Once you have staged a file (often with git add, though some other commands implicitly stage the changes as well, like git rm) you can back out that change with git reset -- <file>.

In your case you must have used git rm to remove the file, which is equivalent to simply removing it with rm and then staging that change. If you first unstage it with git reset -- <file> you can then recover it with git checkout -- <file>.

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