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I have a problem that is really kind of a general programming question, but my implementation is in Java, so I will provide my examples that way

I have a class like this:

public class Foo {
    LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> dataStructure;

    public Foo(LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> dataStructure){
        this.dataStructure = dataStructure;
    }

    public String[][] allUniqueCombinations(){
        //this is what I need to do
    }
}

I need to generate a nested array from my LinkedHashMap that represents every unique combination of all values in the LHM. for example, if my LHM looks like this (pseudocode, but I think you can get the idea..):

{"foo" => ["1","2","3"], "bar" => ["3","2"], "baz" => ["5","6","7"]};

then my String[][] should look like this:

{
   {"foo","bar","baz"},
   {"1","3","5"},
   {"1","2","5"},
   {"1","3","6"},
   {"1","2","6"},
   {"1","3","7"},
   {"1","2","7"},
   {"2","3","5"},
   {"2","2","5"},
   {"2","3","6"},
   {"2","2","6"},
   {"2","3","7"},
   {"2","2","7"},
   {"3","3","5"},
   {"3","2","5"},
   {"3","3","6"},
   {"3","2","6"},
   {"3","3","7"},
   {"3","2","7"},
}

I think that's all of them, I made that manually (obviously) so i might have missed a set, but I think this illustrates what I'm trying to do. It doesn't matter what order each set comes in, so long as all unique combinations are present. Also to be clear, you don't know how many elements are in the LHM, nor how many elements are in each subsequent Vector. Any help is much appreciated. I have found answers that match the case where you want every unique combination of all elements in a single array, but nothing that fits this exactly. If this is an exact duplicate of a question however, please put a link in the response and I will close the question.

update - I changed my types to strings because my realworld example is actually strings. I was trying to use integers to make the example more readable, but the answers I've gotten so far do not translate well to strings. so, yes they are numbers, but in my actual case, they will be strings that wouldn't make much sense to anyone but people who use this particular application. so, this is just an abstraction of it.

Thank you!

Chris

share|improve this question
    
Quick question - why Vector? stackoverflow.com/questions/1386275/… –  josh.trow Mar 6 '12 at 20:55
    
Why are all the uniqueCombinations of length 3? What is the significance of the entry [3,2] in the input? –  Adam Mar 6 '12 at 20:58
    
@josh.trow it's a Vector because it's a Vector. I don't have a good explanation for you. I'm not really a big fan of static typing. –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 21:07
    
@Adam the unique combinations have a length of three because dataStructure.size() == 3 in this scenario. if there were 4 elements in the top level of dataStructure, then each one would be 4.. –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 21:07
    
What is the significance of the Integer key in the LHM? Should the ordering for the combination arrays be based on the order of the keys, or the ordering of the LHM? (i.e. if I added keys 3,2,1 in that order to the LHM, should I use the same ordering or 1,2,3) Suppose I have mappings for keys 1,2,4,6...should the combination array skip 3 and 5 or use some special value? (e.g. 0, -1, etc.) –  Kevin K Mar 6 '12 at 21:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

public static void generate(int[][] sets) {
    int solutions = 1;
    for(int i = 0; i < sets.length; solutions *= sets[i].length, i++);
    for(int i = 0; i < solutions; i++) {
        int j = 1;
        for(int[] set : sets) {
            System.out.print(set[(i/j)%set.length] + " ");
            j *= set.length;
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    generate(new int[][]{{1,2,3}, {3,2}, {5,6,7}});
}

which will print:

1 3 5
2 3 5
3 3 5
1 2 5
2 2 5
3 2 5
1 3 6
2 3 6
3 3 6
1 2 6
2 2 6
3 2 6
1 3 7
2 3 7
3 3 7
1 2 7
2 2 7
3 2 7

I've implemented the algorithm above based on (I believe) one of Knuth's TAOCP books (sorry, no better reference...).

Note that I've named the arrays set, but they needn't hold unique elements, of course. The time I used it, they did contain unique elements, hence the name.

EDIT

It's pretty much a 1-on-1 translation:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.LinkedHashMap;
import java.util.Vector;

public class Foo {

    private LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> dataStructure;

    public Foo(LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> dataStructure){
        this.dataStructure = dataStructure;
    }

    public String[][] allUniqueCombinations(){
        int n = dataStructure.keySet().size();
        int solutions = 1;

        for(Vector<String> vector : dataStructure.values()) {
            solutions *= vector.size();            
        }

        String[][] allCombinations = new String[solutions + 1][];
        allCombinations[0] = dataStructure.keySet().toArray(new String[n]);

        for(int i = 0; i < solutions; i++) {
            Vector<String> combination = new Vector<String>(n);
            int j = 1;
            for(Vector<String> vec : dataStructure.values()) {
                combination.add(vec.get((i/j)%vec.size()));
                j *= vec.size();
            }
            allCombinations[i + 1] = combination.toArray(new String[n]);
        }

        return allCombinations;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> data = new LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>>();
        data.put("foo", new Vector<String>(Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3")));
        data.put("bar", new Vector<String>(Arrays.asList("3", "2")));
        data.put("baz", new Vector<String>(Arrays.asList("5", "6", "7")));

        Foo foo = new Foo(data);

        for(String[] combination : foo.allUniqueCombinations()) {
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(combination));            
        }
    }
}

If you run the class above, the following is printed:

[foo, bar, baz]
[1, 3, 5]
[2, 3, 5]
[3, 3, 5]
[1, 2, 5]
[2, 2, 5]
[3, 2, 5]
[1, 3, 6]
[2, 3, 6]
[3, 3, 6]
[1, 2, 6]
[2, 2, 6]
[3, 2, 6]
[1, 3, 7]
[2, 3, 7]
[3, 3, 7]
[1, 2, 7]
[2, 2, 7]
[3, 2, 7]
share|improve this answer
    
let me see if i can tweak this to fit my scenario, i'll update if it works... –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 21:15
    
this doesn't translate too well to my actual use-case, I updated the question, if you wanted to take another shot at, I'd appreciate it. thanks! –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 21:35
    
well, because the value part of the LHM is a Vector<String>, i can't say solutions *= sets[i].length. also, i can't call dataStructure.get(i.toString()) or anything like that because the keys will be "foo","bar", "baz", etc.. –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 21:44
    
You can iterate over your map, and instead of 'length', you can call 'size. I don't see any problem. –  Bart Kiers Mar 6 '12 at 21:50
    
let me play with it some more, I can see where this is going. The logic seems right, it's just going to take some effort to massage the data structure to get it to fit. –  Chris Drappier Mar 6 '12 at 22:03

Take a look at the following two methods, they do exactly what you asked for. I wrote them to be generic, it doesn't matter how long your lists are or how many keys exist in the map, the combinations generated are correct.

The code below is iterative, based on the algorithm of Python's itertools.product() function for calculating the Cartesian product of a list of lists.

public String[][] allUniqueCombinations() {

    List<String> labels = new ArrayList<String>();
    List<List<String>> lists = new ArrayList<List<String>>();

    for (Map.Entry<String, Vector<String>> entry : dataStructure.entrySet()) {
        labels.add(entry.getKey());
        lists.add(entry.getValue());
    }

    List<List<String>> combinations = product(lists);
    int m = combinations.size() + 1;
    int n = labels.size();
    String[][] answer = new String[m][n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        answer[0][i] = labels.get(i);
    for (int i = 1; i < m; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            answer[i][j] = combinations.get(i-1).get(j);

    return answer;

}

private List<List<String>> product(List<List<String>> lists) {

    List<List<String>> result = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
    result.add(new ArrayList<String>());

    for (List<String> e : lists) {
        List<List<String>> tmp1 = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
        for (List<String> x : result) {
            for (String y : e) {
                List<String> tmp2 = new ArrayList<String>(x);
                tmp2.add(y);
                tmp1.add(tmp2);
            }
        }
        result = tmp1;
    }

    return result;

}

I tested them with the example in the question:

LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>> sample = 
    new LinkedHashMap<String, Vector<String>>();

Vector<String> v1 = new Vector<String>();
v1.add("1"); v1.add("2"); v1.add("3");
Vector<String> v2 = new Vector<String>();
v2.add("3"); v2.add("2");
Vector<String> v3 = new Vector<String>();
v3.add("5"); v3.add("6"); v3.add("7");

sample.put("foo", v1);
sample.put("bar", v2);
sample.put("baz", v3);

Foo foo = new Foo(sample);
String[][] ans = foo.allUniqueCombinations();
for (String[] row : ans)
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(row));

The answer that gets printed is the expected (although the combinations appear in a different order):

[foo, bar, baz]
[1, 3, 5]
[1, 3, 6]
[1, 3, 7]
[1, 2, 5]
[1, 2, 6]
[1, 2, 7]
[2, 3, 5]
[2, 3, 6]
[2, 3, 7]
[2, 2, 5]
[2, 2, 6]
[2, 2, 7]
[3, 3, 5]
[3, 3, 6]
[3, 3, 7]
[3, 2, 5]
[3, 2, 6]
[3, 2, 7]
share|improve this answer
    
Oscar, it was hard to decide whether to accept yours or Bart's answer, I had to go with Bart's since he answered first, but yours is very good as well, thank you! –  Chris Drappier Mar 7 '12 at 15:37

How about generating the product lazily, ie. only create the tuple when you're accessing it?

/**
* A random access view of tuples of a cartesian product of ArrayLists
*
* Orders tuples in the natural order of the cartesian product
*
* @param T the type for both the values and the stored tuples, ie. values of the cartesian factors are singletons
* While the type of input sets is List<T> with elements being treated as singletons
*
*/


abstract public class CartesianProductView<T> extends AbstractList<T> {

private final List<List<T>> factors;
private final int size;

/**
 * @param factors the length of the factors (ie. the elements of the factors argument) should not change,
 *  otherwise get may not return all tuples, or throw exceptions when trying to access the factors outside of range
 */
public CartesianProductView(List<List<T>> factors) {
    this.factors = new ArrayList<>(factors);
    Collections.reverse(this.factors);
    int acc = 1;
    for (Iterator<List<T>> iter = this.factors.iterator(); iter.hasNext(); ) {
        acc *= iter.next().size();
    }
    this.size = acc;
}

@Override
public T get(int index) {
    if (index < 0 || index >= size()) {
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(String.format("index %d > size() %d", index, size()));
    }

    T acc = null;
    for (Iterator<List<T>> iter = factors.iterator(); iter.hasNext();) {
        List<T> set = iter.next();
        acc = makeTupleOrSingleton(set.get(index % set.size()), acc);
        index /= set.size();
    }
    return acc;
}

@Override
public int size() {
    return size;
}

private T makeTupleOrSingleton(T left, T right) {
    if (right == null) {
        return left;
    }
    return makeTuple(left, right);
}

/**
 *
 * @param left      a singleton of a value
 * @param right     a tuple of values taken from the cartesian product factors, with null representing the empty set
 * @return          the sum of left and right, with the value of left being put in front
 */
abstract protected T makeTuple(T left, T right);
}

and use it like this

    final List<List<String>> l1 = new ArrayList<List<String>>() {{ add(singletonList("a")); add(singletonList("b")); add(singletonList("c")); }};
    final List<List<String>> l2 = new ArrayList<List<String>>() {{ add(singletonList("X")); add(singletonList("Y")); }};
    final List<List<String>> l3 = new ArrayList<List<String>>() {{ add(singletonList("1")); add(singletonList("2")); add(singletonList("3")); add(singletonList("4")); }};


    List<List<List<String>>> in = new ArrayList<List<List<String>>>() {{ add(l1); add(l2); add(l3); }};

    List<List<String>> a = new CartesianProductView<List<String>>(in) {

        @Override
        protected List<String> makeTuple(final List<String> left, final List<String> right) {
            return new ArrayList<String>() {{ add(left.get(0)); addAll(right); }};
        }

    };

    System.out.println(a);

[[a, X, 1], [a, X, 2], [a, X, 3], [a, X, 4], [a, Y, 1], [a, Y, 2], [a, Y, 3], [a, Y, 4], [b, X, 1], [b, X, 2], [b, X, 3], [b, X, 4], [b, Y, 1], [b, Y, 2], [b, Y, 3], [b, Y, 4], [c, X, 1], [c, X, 2], [c, X, 3], [c, X, 4], [c, Y, 1], [c, Y, 2], [c, Y, 3], [c, Y, 4]]

As an added bonus, you can use it join strings all with all:

    final List<String> l1 = new ArrayList<String>() {{ add("a"); add("b"); add("c"); }};
    final List<String> l2 = new ArrayList<String>() {{ add("X"); add("Y"); }};
    final List<String> l3 = new ArrayList<String>() {{ add("1"); add("2"); add("3"); add("4"); }};


    List<List<String>> in = new ArrayList<List<String>>() {{ add(l1); add(l2); add(l3); }};

    List<String> a = new CartesianProductView<String>(in) {

        @Override
        protected String makeTuple(String left, String right) {
            return String.format("%s%s", left, right);
        }

    };

    System.out.println(a);

[aX1, aX2, aX3, aX4, aY1, aY2, aY3, aY4, bX1, bX2, bX3, bX4, bY1, bY2, bY3, bY4, cX1, cX2, cX3, cX4, cY1, cY2, cY3, cY4]

share|improve this answer

Here is a link, its c#, but i am sure you could work with that!

share|improve this answer

A LinkedHashMap of Vectors of Strings is ... - troublesome. I had to spend much time in converting a solution to use it, but in the end, I don't produce an ArrayOfArrays, but a List of List and keep the last step to the reader.

import java.util.*;
/**
    CartesianProductLHM   
*/
public class CartesianProductLHM
{
    LinkedHashMap <String, Vector<String>> dataStructure;

    public CartesianProductLHM (final String[] data) {
        dataStructure = new LinkedHashMap <String, Vector<String>> ();
        for (String str : data)
        {
            String [] kv = str.split (":");
            String [] values = kv[1].split (","); 
            Vector <String> v = new Vector <String> ();
            for (String s: values) {
                v.add (s);
            //  System.out.print (s); 
            }
            // System.out.println ("\n---");
            dataStructure.put (kv[0], v);
        }
        // System.out.println ("    --- --- ---");
    }

    List <String> getCombiFor (final int i, final List <List <String>> livs) 
    {
        List <String> ls = new ArrayList <String> ();
        if (! livs.isEmpty ()) {
            List <String> vs = livs.remove (0); 
            int idx = i % vs.size (); 
            String elem = vs.get (idx);
            ls.add (elem);
            ls.addAll (getCombiFor (i / vs.size (), livs));
        }
        return ls;
    }

    List <String> getOuterCombiFor (int i, List <List <String>> coll) 
    {
        List <String> ls = new ArrayList <String> ();
        if (! coll.isEmpty ()) {
            List <List <String>> livs = new ArrayList <List <String>> ();
            for (List<String> li : coll) 
            {
                livs.add (li);
            }   
            ls.addAll (getCombiFor (i, livs));
        } 
        return ls;  
    }   

    public List <List <String>> allUniqueCombinations () {
        Collection <Vector <String>> li = dataStructure.values (); 
        List <List <String>> lls = new ArrayList <List <String>> ();
        for (Vector <String> vs : li) {
            List <String> l = new ArrayList <String> ();
            for (String s : vs) {
                l.add (s);
            }
            lls.add (l);
        }
        int count = 1;
        for (Vector <String> vec: li) {
            count *= vec.size ();
        }       
        List <List <String>> result = new ArrayList <List <String>> ();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i) 
        {
            List <String> l = getOuterCombiFor (i, lls);
            result.add (l);
        }
        return result;  
    }

    public static void main (String args[])
    {
        String[] arr = {"foo:1,2,3", "bar:a,b", "baz:5,6,7"};
        CartesianProductLHM cp = new CartesianProductLHM (arr);
        List <List <String>> lls = cp.allUniqueCombinations ();
        for (List <String> ls : lls) 
        {
            for (String s : ls)
                System.out.print (s + "\t");
            System.out.println ();
        }
    }
}

Well - yes, and I parse some test data.

The main idea is, that you have some Lists (abc, 12, defg, ...) and you have 3 possibilities at pos 0, 2 at pos 1, 4 at pos 3 and so on, so 3*2*4 combinations so far.

From the numbers 0 to 23 you can pick from each sublist with modulo, and hand the rest of the number divided by the size of the previous list and the remaining lists recursively to the procedure, until there is no list left.

share|improve this answer

You could also solve this really easily with Functional Java's List monad:

import fj.data.List;

public class cartesian {
 public static void main(String[] args) {
  List<String>  foo = List.list("a", "b");
  List<Integer> bar = List.list(1,2,3);
  List<Float>   baz = List.list(0.2f,0.4f,0.3f);

  List<P3<String, Integer, Float>> 
  // the Cartesian product is assembled into a list of P3's
  result = foo.bind(bar, baz, P.<String, Integer, Float>p3()); 

  String out = Show.listShow(Show.p3Show(Show.stringShow, Show.intShow, Show.floatShow))
               .showS(result);
  System.out.println(out);
 }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm late to the party but I followed Shiomi's link and translated the functions into Java. The result is an easy to follow and understand algorithm (I may be a little slow since I had a hard time understanding Bart Kiers' solution).

Here it is (the key is an int, replacing to String should be straightforward):

Usage

    public void testProduct(){
        Map<Integer, List<String>> data =   new LinkedHashMap<Integer, List<String>>(){{                
            put(0, new ArrayList<String>(){{
                add("John"); add("Sarah");                      
            }});                
            put(1, new ArrayList<String>(){{
                add("Red"); add("Green"); add("Blue"); add("Orange");
            }});
            put(2, new ArrayList<String>(){{
                add("Apple"); add("Tomatoe"); add("Bananna");                   
            }});
    }};

        List<String[]> product =  GetCrossProduct(data);
        for(String[] o : product)
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(o));

    }

Result

[John, Red, Apple]
[John, Red, Tomatoe]
[John, Red, Bananna]
[John, Green, Apple]
[John, Green, Tomatoe]
[John, Green, Bananna]
[John, Blue, Apple]
[John, Blue, Tomatoe]
[John, Blue, Bananna]
[John, Orange, Apple]
[John, Orange, Tomatoe]
[John, Orange, Bananna]
[Sarah, Red, Apple]
[Sarah, Red, Tomatoe]
[Sarah, Red, Bananna]
[Sarah, Green, Apple]
[Sarah, Green, Tomatoe]
[Sarah, Green, Bananna]
[Sarah, Blue, Apple]
[Sarah, Blue, Tomatoe]
[Sarah, Blue, Bananna]
[Sarah, Orange, Apple]
[Sarah, Orange, Tomatoe]
[Sarah, Orange, Bananna]

Cartesian Product Functions

    public static List<String[]> GetCrossProduct(Map<Integer, List<String>> lists)
    {
        List<String[]> results = new ArrayList<String[]>();
        GetCrossProduct(results, lists, 0, new String[(lists.size())]);
        return results;
    }

    private void GetCrossProduct(List<String[]> results, Map<Integer, List<String>> lists, int depth, String[] current)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < lists.get(depth).size(); i++)
        {
            current[depth] = lists.get(depth).get(i);            
            if (depth < lists.keySet().size() - 1)
                GetCrossProduct(results, lists, depth + 1, current);
            else{
                results.add(Arrays.copyOf(current,current.length));                
            }
        }
    }       
share|improve this answer

I know it's long after you needed the answer, but somehow I can't refrain from noticing that one could switch to Groovy, at least for some part of a Java application, and write a wrapper class to match the desired interface. The Groovy code for such permutations is

myListOfLists.combinations()

Ever since I started using Groovy in my Java applications, it's much faster to write them and way more interesting to debug/profile them (ehem...)

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