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In my IIS log, I found warning level event ID 1013, which says the stop time exceeds expected stop time for worker process of a specific web application.

My question is, how could I know or track from what reason IIS worker process stops? Does this warning level event ID means worker process application pool is stopped or not?

thanks in advance, George

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1 Answer 1

If you application is an ASP.NET (2.0 or newer) you can turn on health monitoring which shoudl record details including IIS applciation pool resets.

Useful links

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It is old code, .Net 1.1. Any ideas? –  George2 Jun 6 '09 at 8:37
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Perhaps try using a different error loging technology. I've found the ELMAH technology set to be excellent: code.google.com/p/elmah –  Kane Jun 6 '09 at 8:48
    
Thanks, does the error message means application pool worker process is actually stopped or not? The more accurate message is -- "A process serving application pool 'DefaultAppPool' exceeded time limits during shut down." –  George2 Jun 6 '09 at 8:53
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It sounds like, for some reason, that when the IIS application pool was trying to shut down there was a process lock and it couldn't shut down. IIS app pools normally shut down every 24 hours or after 35,000 requests or when xxxMB is used. You might want to create a new application pool and re-configure it to your needs. This link might help (although it's for IIS7) asp.net/learn/iis-videos –  Kane Jun 6 '09 at 9:11
    
1. I want to know whether my application pool actually shutdown or not? Any ideas? 2. "IIS app pools normally shut down every 24 hours or after 35,000 requests" -- from default IIS application pool recycle settings, seems there is no 24 hours or 35000 requests settings, please correct me if I am wrong. 3. "when xxxMB is used" -- what do you mean this setting? Which one in IIS manager do you mean? –  George2 Jun 7 '09 at 14:34

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