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Need some help with regex matching please. I'm trying to match a double quoted string of text, within a large string, that itself can contain pairs of double quotes! Here's an example:

"Please can ""you"" match this"

A fuller example of my problem and where I've got so far is shown below. The code below only stores 'paris' correctly in the hash, both london and melbourne are incorrect due to the double quote pair terminating the long description early.

Any help much appreciated.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %hash;

my $delimiter = '/begin CITY';
local $/ = $delimiter;

my $top_of_file = <DATA>;
my $records=0;

while(<DATA>) {

   my ($section_body) = m{^(.+)/end CITY}ms;

   $section_body =~ s{/\*.*?\*/}{}gs;     # Remove any comments in string

   $section_body =~ m{  ^\s+(.+?)   ## Variable name is never whitespace seperated
                                    ## Always underscored.  Akin to C variable names

                        \s+(".*?")  ## The long description can itself contain
                                    ## pairs of double quotes ""like this""

                        \s+(.+)     ## Everything from here can be split on
                                    ## whitespace

                        \s+$
                     }msx;

   $hash{$records}{name} = $1;
   $hash{$records}{description} = $2;

   my (@data) = split ' ', $3;

   @{ $hash{$records} }{qw/ size currency /} = @data;

   ++$records;
}

print Dumper(\%hash);


__DATA__
Some header information

/begin CITY

    london  /* city name */
    "This is a ""difficult"" string to regex"
    big
    Sterling

/end CITY

/begin CITY paris
         "This is a simple comment to grab."
         big
         euro  /* the address */
/end CITY


/begin CITY

    Melbourne
    "Another ""hard"" long description to 'match'."
    big
    Dollar

/end CITY
share|improve this question
    
I'm unclear on what the expected output is, or even the input. –  yzxben Mar 6 '12 at 21:20
    
@peapls well the example input is in the __DATA__ section. –  dlamblin Mar 6 '12 at 21:28
    
I think you should be testing this with a regexp tool; E.G. regexbuddy.com or something like that. –  dlamblin Mar 6 '12 at 21:36
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change this:

".*?"

to this:

"(?>(?:[^"]+|"")*)"

Also, your use of non-greedy matching isn't very safe. Something like this:

\s+(.+?)   ## Variable name is never whitespace seperated
           ## Always underscored.  Akin to C variable names

could well end up including whitespace inside the variable-name, if Perl finds that that's the only way to match. (It will prefer to stop before including whitespace, but it makes no guarantees.)

And you should always check to make sure that m{} found something. If you're sure that it will always match, then you can just tack on an or die to validate that.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer, and thanks for taking the time to respond, plus your additional comments heeded. Care to explain a little how that regex is working? –  Chris Mar 6 '12 at 22:39
    
@Chris: [^"]+ means "one or more characters that aren't double-quotes". "" means "two consecutive double-quotes". So (?:[^"]+|"")* means "a sequence of non-double-quote-characters, optionally mixed in with pairs of consecutive double-quotes". (?>...) is a special Perl notation meaning "once you've matched ..., don't backtrack back into it"; it's not 100% necessary here, but it's a bit of a safety-check; it ensures that, given something like "x ""y"" z (with a missing double-quote at the end), the regex wouldn't backtrack and match "x ""y". (That is, it ensures that [continued] –  ruakh Mar 6 '12 at 22:44
    
[continued] "" inside the quoted string will never be read as "end-of-string delimiter, followed by an extra "", even if reading it that way could allow the regex to match.) In this case, come to think of it, it doesn't actually have any effect except potentially a small performance boost, because you're already specifying that the end-of-string delimiter is followed by \s+, but I'm in the habit of always using (?>...) in these sorts of expressions, just in case. –  ruakh Mar 6 '12 at 22:48
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I don't know how much luck you are going to have with parsing quoted text with your own regexes, it can be pretty dicey business. I would look at a module like Text::Balanced.

https://metacpan.org/pod/Text::Balanced

That ought to do what you need it too, and a good bit less painfully.

I know I'm supposed to answer the question as asked, but regexes are really not the way you want to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know if I agree. Text::Balanced::gen_delimited_pat('"','"') could be used to create a regex for this, but in this situation, it seems like that doesn't really help anything. –  ruakh Mar 6 '12 at 21:41
    
I was thinking along the lines of using extract_delimited() or extract_multiple() and not really worrying about the regex (or other parsing technique) actually in use. –  Sean O'Leary Mar 7 '12 at 0:21
    
Ah. I didn't think that extract_delimited supported the case that a literal " is written as "", but I see now that it does. That makes sense, then. :-) –  ruakh Mar 7 '12 at 0:45
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I'm uncertain if this is just an example to demonstrate your issue, but this could be solved by reading line by line:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;
my %hash;
my $delimiter = '/begin CITY';
local $/ = $delimiter;
my $top_of_file = <DATA>;
my $records=0;
my @lines;
sub trim
{
        my $string = shift;
        $string =~ s/^\s+//;
        $string =~ s/\s+$//;
        return $string;
}
while(<DATA>) {
   my ($section_body) = m{^(.+)/end CITY}ms;
   $section_body =~ s{/\*.*?\*/}{}gs; # Remove any comments in string
   $section_body =~ s{^\s*\n}{}gs;    # Remove empty lines
#################
   if ($section_body =~ m{".*"}) {    # Or a normal greedy match
     $hash{$records}{quoted} = $&;
   }
#################
   @lines = split "\n", $section_body, 5;
   $hash{$records}{name} = trim($lines[0]);
   $hash{$records}{description} = trim($lines[1]);
   $hash{$records}{size} = trim($lines[2]);
   $hash{$records}{currency} = trim($lines[3]);
   ++$records;
}
print Dumper(\%hash);

__DATA__
Some header information

/begin CITY

    london  /* city name */
    "This is a ""difficult"" string to regex"
    big
    Sterling

/end CITY

/begin CITY paris
         "This is a simple comment to grab."
         big
         euro  /* the address */
/end CITY


/begin CITY

    Melbourne
    "Another ""hard"" long description to 'match'."
    big
    Dollar


/end CITY

Also note that I've pointed out that the only problem you had was that the ".*?" should probably be a ".*".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to respond but whilst my examples all had newline separators I don't want to rely upon this. Eg, /begin CITY Melbourne "Another ""hard"" long description to 'match'." big Dollar /end CITY ...fails. –  Chris Mar 6 '12 at 22:34
    
@Chris I see; well no problem then. Assuming there's only one field that is quoted, you only needed to change your non-greedy quoted match into a greedy match. –  dlamblin Mar 6 '12 at 22:57
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