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In my app I have to check user location and then connect to server to find out what is the nearest city. It means I have two expensive objects, that I would like to retain on configuration change. One is the task which find out the location, and the other is AsyncTask to retrieve data from server. Now what should I do, to retain both?

My approach is to create a static class in my Activity like this:

static class NonConfigurationObject{

    MyLocation myLocationObject;
    AsyncTask myAsyncTask;

}

Then when these two objects are created I pass them to this NonConfigurationObject and retain this object and then find out if MyLocation and AsyncTask are there and if there is no need to create them.

Is this a good approach? Because it seems good to me, but I didn't see it done this way anywhere.

EDIT: So this approach seems to be ok. But if you have another way of doing it, please share it.

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I also finding some way to pass multiple object, can you tell more how did you accomplished this. –  Dory Dec 27 '13 at 9:35
    
This is not the right way to do it anymore. onRetainNonCOnfigurationInstance is deprecated now: developer.android.com/reference/android/app/…. –  Michał K Dec 27 '13 at 11:15
    
So how could be this done. –  Dory Dec 27 '13 at 11:21
    
There's really lots of examples out there. You can start with "Related" questions section on the right side. Generally the best way would be to use Fragments and setRetainInstance(). But it really depends on what you need. –  Michał K Dec 27 '13 at 11:32
    
Okay thnks for reply. –  Dory Dec 27 '13 at 11:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is an acceptable approach as long as you use a static class to avoid leaking memory.

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Thanks for fast response. It's ACCEPTABLE, you say. So is there any better, more optimized, simplier, whatever approach? –  Michał K Mar 6 '12 at 22:07
    
I don't think there is a better way. It is light weight, simple and fast. I say acceptable because I don't like saying there is only one way to do something :) –  Charles Harley Mar 6 '12 at 22:11

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