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What I only want written to the file descriptor is the input string. However, it also writes the error messages passed in fprintf. Can someone explain why it is behaving like this? This small program shows the behavior.

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int fd;
    mode_t mode = S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR;
    char *filename = "file.txt";
    char *input = "hello world";
    char output[20];

    // create and close
    if((fd = open(filename, O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, mode)) == -1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error.\n");
        return -1;
    }
    close(fd);

    // just open
    if((fd = open(filename, O_RDWR, mode)) == -1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error.\n");
        return -1;
    }

    if(write(fd, input, 200) == -1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error.\n");
        return -1;
    }

    // move back to beginning
    if(lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_SET) == -1)
    { 
        return -1;
    }

    if(read(fd, &output, 200) == -1)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error.\n");
        return -1;
    }

    printf("%s\n", output);

    return 0;
}
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1  
You haven't shown us enough of your program to answer your question. Please provide a complete example. –  Carl Norum Mar 6 '12 at 22:30
    
What does "even if it reaches it" mean? I seem to get the gist that the output to the files seems to be happening, even though your diagnostics are being printed. I suspect that what you think is happening isn't really happening and you are just confusing yourself somehow. Note that your open() call does not truncate the file. Are you checking that open() succeeded, even? Maybe you're not really opening the file and the file descriptor is actually bad. But when you look at the file, you are looking at the right file and the data is there. What is the timestamp on the file when you do ls -l? –  Kaz Mar 6 '12 at 22:34
    
What I only want written to the file descriptor is the content in block. However when I open the file after having written to it, it contains the message in block and all of the fprintf messages such as Cannot write.\n –  Kobi Mar 6 '12 at 22:45
    
Can you post a small compilable program that reproduces this? –  hmjd Mar 6 '12 at 22:50
    
I added a program that shows the behavior. –  Kobi Mar 6 '12 at 22:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
write(fd, input, 200)

//...

read(fd, &output, 200)

You're writing and reading well past the arrays that contain valid data - neither input nor output are anywhere close to 200 bytes. So who knows what's going to end up in the file (and I'm not sure why the read() doesn't crash your program)?

share|improve this answer

Input is not 200 chars long. Replace 200 with strlen(input)

Or use this macro

#define write1(s) write(1, s, strlen(s))

Note, you will need to #include < string.h > for strlen

share|improve this answer
    
That would be <string.h> . :) –  Kaz Mar 7 '12 at 2:22
    
@Kaz - fixed, thanks –  technosaurus Mar 7 '12 at 2:40

This doesn't sound like a fd problem... but rather a memory error. Notice that your format string was not substituted, but you got the actual format string. The fact that your write uses block and read uses &block seems a little suspicious, although hard to say if that's it without any context. It sounds like you're writing memory from your program that just happens to contain the strings of your program.

I suggest running your program with valgrind.

UPDATE based on added code:

read() and write() do not work on "strings", they will write as many bytes as you ask for. Your input is a string literal, and it's much smaller than 200 bytes... Since it's likely all string literals are stored in the same general area in your program, that's why you see others popping up in your output.

A few other issues as well -- your output buffer is not large enough to handle the read() you requested, and you probably want to use lseek() inbetween the write and the read in order to be able to read the data again.

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I added a sample program in my original post. I am not using the same variable for read and write, that was only an example. Sorry about that. –  Kobi Mar 6 '12 at 23:00

It sounds like you closed stderr or something. Somehow, fd and stderr contain the same integer, so both your write (which must be failing) and the fprintf are using the same file descriptor. Try checking the value of errno, perhaps using perror or something, and see if there is more information there.

Bottom line, you should probably run it under a debugger and watch the values of fd and stderr.

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Well the fd returned from open is 3, which is correct since I am writing to another file. Not stderr which is 2. –  Kobi Mar 6 '12 at 22:52

I'll bet money that 'fd' is being declared or scoped oddly. the file descriptor in UNIX is simply an integer between 0 and some maximum value (used to be 20, now it's way bigger) which is an index into a table. STDIN==0, STDOUT==1, and STDERR==2.

If you're seeing the behavior you describe, somehow fd is == 2.

share|improve this answer
    
How should fd be declared. At the moment, it is declared but not set until open has been called. Then, if it == -1, I error, otherwise it returns 3. –  Kobi Mar 6 '12 at 22:45

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