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I am trying to design a class as a Code Kata for myself that has a value property that can be set, and the class can issue ValueListener instances. The idea is that there is one instance of ValueHolder with many client threads accessing it concurrently. Each client thread has requested a ValueWatcher and has called waitForValue().

What I am really struggling with is what condition I should use on the while loop around the wait() to avoid spurious notifications (i.e. value hasn't changed). I can see that this design may make it possible of ValueWatcher instances to miss updates, but am less worried about that at this stage.

Would appreciate any guidance on offer!

public class ValueHolder {

  private int value = 0;
  private final Object monitor = new Object();

  public void setValue(int value) {
    synchronized(monitor) {
      this.value = value;
      monitor.notifyAll();
    }
  }

  ValueWatcher createChangeWatcher() {
    return new ValueWatcher();
  }

  private class ValueWatcher {
    public int waitForValue() {
      synchronized(monitor) {
        while (==== ??? =====) {
          monitor.wait();
          return value;
        }
      }
    }
  }     
}
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Are you seeing spurious notifications? If only the updater calls notify or notifyall then I don't see how you would be. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 22:34
    
Could be that the setValue call should only notify others if the value has actually changed? Right now it could be updated with the same value and everyone gets notified. Is that what you want? –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 22:35
    
I don't see why there is a need for a while loop at all. –  biziclop Mar 6 '12 at 22:40
    
@Gray - I am not seeing spurious wake-ups, but these are entirely possible depending on Java/OS implementation (although rare). I want to design correctly. –  Scruffers Mar 6 '12 at 22:41
1  
@biziclop - a "spurious wakeup" is permitted to occur, in general, as a concession to the underlying platform semantics. Please see the following Oracle documentation for concurrent.locks.Condition which I would consider authoritative since was written by Doug Lea :) –  Scruffers Mar 6 '12 at 22:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Interesting problem. Here's one solution off the top of my head. Have a version number along with the value that is being changed. Whenever the value is updated, the version number is also incremented so the ValueWatcher objects can then check to see if the version went up meaning a change has happened.

Edit: I initially had an AtomicLong but I am stealing the idea of a wrapper object from @John Vint.

private final VersionValue versionValue = new VersionValue();

public void setValue(int value) {
    synchronized (monitor) {
       versionValue.value = value;
       versionValue.version++;
       monitor.notifyAll();
    }
}

 private class ValueWatcher {
     private long localVersion = 0;
     public int waitForValue() {
         synchronized (monitor) {
             while (true) {
                 if (localVersion < versionValue.version) {
                     // NOTE: the value might have been set twice here
                     localVersion = versionValue.version;
                     return versionValue.value;
                 }
                 monitor.wait();
             }
         }
     }
}

private static class VersionValue {
    int value;
    long version;
}

Also, although spurious wakeups are possible it is important to remember that the text:

Always invoke wait inside a loop that tests for the condition being waited for. Don't assume that the interrupt was for the particular condition you were waiting for, or that the condition is still true.

Is more about race conditions and producer/consumer models than spurious wakeups. See my page here about that.

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To do that without races you would have to combine the version number with the value in a single atomic type (e.g: AtomicLong versionedValue = value | (long) version << 0xffff. –  ninjalj Mar 6 '12 at 23:05
    
Oh I see it. I need to move my synchronized outside the while. Right. Thanks @ninjalj. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:10
    
race: you get localCounter for update n and return value of update n+1. Next time you get localCounter for update n+1 and return an unchanged value –  ninjalj Mar 6 '12 at 23:11
    
I widened the synchronized block @ninjalj. I set the localCounter to be the value of the globalCounter. The value that gets returned is always the latest one. Next time through localCounter = n+1 so nothing is returned. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:15
1  
@ninjalj The complication does not come from incorrect use of wait and notify. It comes from the rather special requirement that every single value change has to trigger one and only one response. In real life this very rarely is the case, so most wait/notify constructions are a lot simpler. –  biziclop Mar 6 '12 at 23:31

All you really care about is if the value changed after you enter the method and its synchronized block. So take a timestamps of the last time a value has been changed and only continue when the last updated timestamp > then when you entered.

    private final StampedValue stamped = new StampedValue();

    public void setValue(int value) {
        synchronized (monitor) {
            this.stamped.value = value;
            this.stamped.lastUpdated = System.currentTimeMillis();
            monitor.notifyAll();
        }
    }
    private class ValueWatcher {

        public int waitForValue() { 
          synchronized(monitor) {
               long enteredOn = System.currentTimeMillis();    
               while (enteredOn > stamped.lastUpdated) {
                   monitor.wait();
               }
               return stamped.value;
          }
        }
    }
    private class StampedValue {
        long lastUpdated = System.currentTimeMillis();
        int value;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
There's some problems in the while loop @John. I think you want the return outside of it maybe? –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:24
    
Also, the first time through it is likely that if the value has not been set, the waitForValue() will return 0 right off the bat because enteredOn is now and lastUpdated is 0. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:26
    
@Gray Yea copy and paste failed me –  John Vint Mar 6 '12 at 23:27
    
I stole your idea for a wrapper object @John. +1 for it. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:57
    
Hey dude. What happened to your comments to my other question? You should post an answer to that question with them because they were spot on. –  Gray Mar 7 '12 at 20:37

What about each listener having a BlockingQueue which it gives to the value-setting thread as part of its registration as a listener? Then, when the value is changed, the value-setting thread simply loops over each of those queues, giving it the new value. You may want to use BlockingQueue.offer in that loop, so that if one thread isn't yet ready to receive the new value, it won't stop other threads from receiving it.

This may not be the most efficient approach, but it's simple, and the concurrent structure (ie the hard part) is well-tested and maintained for you. And it's not that inefficient, either.

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+1 This would be a simplified version of what I did. –  biziclop Mar 6 '12 at 23:38
private class ValueWatcher {
  private int oldValue = 0;

  public int waitForValue() {
    synchronized(monitor) {
      while (value == oldValue) {
        monitor.wait();
      }
      oldValue = value
      return oldValue;
    }
  }
}  
share|improve this answer
    
There's a race here in case the value changes and then is changed back. –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 22:56
    
That has one obvious problem: If we set the value to the existing value (ie newVal == oldVal)we lose an update. ABA problem –  Voo Mar 6 '12 at 23:06
    
Also I think there's a bug there that would cause an infinite loop. I think you want to say if (oldValue != value) { oldValue = value ; break } –  Gray Mar 6 '12 at 23:07
    
@Voo: I contend that value should have some meaningful value, which is what the watchers should be interested in. Bistate booleans don't qualify, unless you run 2 threads in lockstep. –  ninjalj Mar 6 '12 at 23:27
public class ValueHolder {

    private final Object monitor = new Object();
    private LinkedList<WeakReference<ValueWatcher>> waiters = new LinkedList<WeakReference<ValueWatcher>>();

    public void setValue(int value) {
        synchronized (monitor) {
            Iterator<WeakReference<ValueWatcher>> it = waiters.iterator();
            while (it.hasNext()) {
                WeakReference<ValueWatcher> ref = it.next();
                if (ref.get() == null)
                    it.remove();
                else
                    ref.get().waitingList.add(value);
            }
            monitor.notifyAll();
        }
    }

    ValueWatcher createChangeWatcher() {
        ValueWatcher ret = new ValueWatcher();
        synchronized( monitor ) {
            waiters.add(new WeakReference<ValueWatcher>(ret));
        }
        return ret;
    }

    private class ValueWatcher {

        private Queue<Integer> waitingList = new LinkedList<Integer>();

        public int waitForValue() {
            synchronized (monitor) {
                while (waitingList.isEmpty()) {
                    monitor.wait();
                }
                return waitingList.poll();
            }
        }
    }
}

The idea is that you keep track of who's waiting and each watcher has a queue of values that have been set since the last invocation of waitForValue(). This removes the need to store value in ValueHolder, which is a good thing as by the time a ValueWatcher wakes up, that could have changed several times. The drawback of this method is that as you can see is that creating new watchers will block until the monitor is free.

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