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I can create a temporary table this way:

session.execute("CREATE TABLE temptable SELECT, "
    "existingtable.column2 FROM existingtable WHERE<100000")

but the new table is unreadable because it says it has no primary key. is the primary key of exisitingtable, so I expected it to get the same treatment in the temp table.

However, I would rather find some ORM way of doing this anyway. Given:

temp_table = Table('temptable', metadata, 
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('column2', Integer),
    useexisting=True )
class TempTable(object):
mapper(TempTable, temp_table)
temp_table.create(bind=session.bind, checkfirst=True)
if session.query(TempTable).delete(): #make sure it's empty

How can I populate temp_table with some selected contents of existingtable without doing 100000 session.query.add(TempTable(...)) commands? Or is there a way of creating the table from a query similar to the plain SQL version above?

share|improve this question
Just curios.. would it work if you create definition of temp table with first approach? for example create table tablename (id primarykey, column1) Insert into tablename select id, column2 from existing table where... – AJP Mar 7 '12 at 0:57
@AJP Yes, I think this is the answer. Unfortunately, no SA ORM equivalent of INSERT INTO and no easy way for me to compile my relatively complicated query into a sql statement. – Paul Mar 7 '12 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's not exactly ORM, but to create the table initially, I'd clone the table structure (see cloneTable in the example below). For copying the data, I then would use the InsertFromSelect example.

Edit: Since version 0.8.3, SqlAlchemy supports Insert.from_select() out of the box. Hence the InsertFromSelect class and the respective visitor in the example below can be directly replaced and are no longer needed. I leave the original example unchanged for historic reasons.

Here is a working example

from sqlalchemy import Table
from sqlalchemy.ext.compiler import compiles
from sqlalchemy.sql.expression import UpdateBase

class InsertFromSelect(UpdateBase):
    def __init__(self, table, select):
        self.table = table = select

def visit_insert_from_select(element, compiler, **kw):
    return "INSERT INTO %s %s" % (
        compiler.process(element.table, asfrom=True),

def cloneTable(name, table, metadata):
    cols = [c.copy() for c in table.columns]
    constraints = [c.copy() for c in table.constraints]
    return Table(name, metadata, *(cols + constraints))

# test data
from sqlalchemy import MetaData, Column, Integer
from sqlalchemy.engine import create_engine
e = create_engine('sqlite://')
m = MetaData(e)
t = Table('t', m, Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
          Column('number', Integer))
e.execute(t.insert().values(id=1, number=3))
e.execute(t.insert().values(id=9, number=-3))

# create temp table
temp = cloneTable('temp', t, m)

# copy data
ins = InsertFromSelect(temp,>5))

# print result
for r in e.execute(
    print r
share|improve this answer
Unfortunately, I get an importerror when running this : ImportError: cannot import name UpdateBase. Similar import error using the InsertFromSelect example. I'm using SA 0.5.7 – Paul Mar 7 '12 at 14:49
@Paul: ah, this functionality is only available since SA 0.6. I have tested it with 0.7.5 – stephan Mar 7 '12 at 14:51
Very nice answer. I really needed this solution. I have this question to you.… Is your method the best way to go here. As in create table first and then do the insert from select? – Ranjith Jun 1 at 14:10
@Ranjith: for this case, I'd probably create my own custom SQL Construct SelectInto (similar to the InsertFromSelect above) that leverages the available syntax in most SQL dialects with dialect-specific compilation rules (e.g. SELECT * INTO NewTable FROM OldTable for SQL Server or CREATE TABLE NewTable AS SELECT * FROM OldTable in Oracle or SQLite). You could also look into materialized views (Oracle) or indexed views (SQL Server). – stephan Jun 2 at 5:01
Thanks for the inputs Stephan – Ranjith Jun 2 at 6:17

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