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I'm working on an assignment dealing with threading and synchronization with pthreads. In the example code, the main thread creates two other threads which execute fine. The main thread is blocked until both these "child" threads terminate. At least, this is the way I understand it. When the main thread resumes execution, it seems to be getting a segmentation fault when it calls the destructor for AvionicsTask. Honestly, I have no idea why, except that I may not be initializing something correctly. Anyway, the code is as follows:

Task.h:

class Task {
protected:
    /* -- NAME */
    static const int MAX_NAME_LEN = 15;
    char name[MAX_NAME_LEN];

    /* -- IMPLEMENTATION */
    pthread_t thread_id;

public:
    /* -- CONSTRUCTOR/DESTRUCTOR */
    Task(const char _name[]) {

        std::strncpy(name, _name, MAX_NAME_LEN);
    }
    ~Task(){}
    /* -- ACCESSORS */
    char * Name();

    virtual void Start();    
    virtual void Run()= 0;
    static void GracefullyExitMainThread();
};

Task.cpp:

#include "task.h"

std::vector<pthread_t> tasklist;        //keep track of tasks created

void * thunkfunc(void * args) {
        Task * task_instance = (Task *)args;
        task_instance->Run();
        return NULL;
}

void Task::Start(){
    pthread_t threadmachine;
    void * start_arg = NULL;
    pthread_create(&threadmachine,  NULL, thunkfunc, this);
    tasklist.push_back(threadmachine);
}

void Task::GracefullyExitMainThread() {
    void** return_value;                //unused
    for(int i = 0; i < tasklist.size(); i++){
        pthread_join(tasklist[i], return_value);
    }
}

char * Task::Name(){
    return name; 
}

Task_Test_step1.cpp:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include "task.h"


class RudderController : public Task {
public:
  RudderController(char _name[]) : Task(_name) {}

  void Run() {
    cout << "Rudder Controller [" << name << "] running\n" << flush;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
      cout << name << " waiting for next sensor input\n" << flush;
      usleep(1000000);
      cout << name << " issueing rudder control command" << i << "\n" << flush;
      usleep(10000);
    }
  }
};

class AvionicsTask : public Task {
public:
  AvionicsTask(char _name[]) : Task(_name) {}

  void Run() {
    cout << "Avionics System [" << name << "] running\n" << flush;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
      cout << name << " waiting for next refresh interval\n" << flush;
      usleep(700000);
      cout << name << " refreshing avionics screen " << i << "\n" << flush;
      usleep(12000);
    }
  }
};

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {

  /* -- CREATE TASKS */
  RudderController task1("rudder control");
  AvionicsTask     task2("avionics task");

  /* -- LAUNCH TASKS */
  task1.Start();
  task2.Start();

  Task::GracefullyExitMainThread();
}

the output of the program with gdb:

Starting program: /home/ben/Desktop/Part 1/test 
[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
[New Thread 0x7ffff707e700 (LWP 6797)]
Rudder Controller [rudder control] running
rudder control waiting for next sensor input
[New Thread 0x7ffff687d700 (LWP 6798)]
Avionics System [avionics task] running
avionics task waiting for next refresh interval
avionics task refreshing avionics screen 0
...
//more messages from the threads
...
avionics task refreshing avionics screen 9
[Thread 0x7ffff687d700 (LWP 6798) exited]
rudder control issueing rudder control command7
rudder control waiting for next sensor input
rudder control issueing rudder control command8
rudder control waiting for next sensor input
rudder control issueing rudder control command9
[Thread 0x7ffff707e700 (LWP 6797) exited]

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000000000401ffa in AvionicsTask::~AvionicsTask (this=0xffffffffffffffc0, 
    __in_chrg=<optimized out>) at task_test_step1.cpp:21
21  class AvionicsTask : public Task {
share|improve this question
    
Can you build this in debug mode and run it through a debugger? This should yield useful intelligence about the crash. The part about crashing in the AvionicsTask destructor sounded like it might be a guess. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 7 '12 at 0:03
    
@MultimediaMike Oh of course! I forgot to put in the gdb output. I'll edit the question to show this. –  Ben Creighton Mar 7 '12 at 0:19
    
That 'this' pointer looks really wrong (contains -64). I'd say you have found the cause. You just need to figure out how it gets into that state. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 7 '12 at 0:37
    
That's exactly what I don't understand. Why is the object pointer what it is? –  Ben Creighton Mar 7 '12 at 1:18
    
Something else must be writing that value into that location. It looks like you're running this on Linux. Install and run valgrind against your app. This should tell you where and when the memory is being stepped on. Another tip: compile with -O0 in order to disable optimizations at this phase. –  Multimedia Mike Mar 7 '12 at 1:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way you're using return_value is wrong:

void** return_value;               
for(int i = 0; i < tasklist.size(); i++){
    pthread_join(tasklist[i], return_value); // <== return_value has an indeterminate value
                                             // who knows where pthread_join() will write to?
}

Just pass in NULL if you're not interested in what the thread you're joining passes to pthread_exit() (or equivalently what the thread function returns):

for(int i = 0; i < tasklist.size(); i++){
    pthread_join(tasklist[i], NULL);   // <== ignore what the thread returns
}

If you ever do decide you want to get the value returned by the thread, use something that looks like:

void* return_value;               
for(int i = 0; i < tasklist.size(); i++){
    pthread_join(tasklist[i], &return_value);

    // return_value contains the data the thread returned...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I'm not sure I would have ever caught that without having had someone else look at it. Our TA is really worthless for this sort of thing. –  Ben Creighton Mar 7 '12 at 3:29

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