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So I have one main file, and two classes: A display Class, and a job class.

What I want to achieve, is for the main class to be able to call the display class, as well as interface with the job class, BUT I also want the Job Class to be able to call methods from the Display class and send parameters to the display class as well.

I have tried multiple ways of fixing my current problem, but I have not been able to accomplish what I am wanting, I have heard about namespaces, but I am unfamiliar with them and am not sure if this is what I need.

I have also tried to pass the Job/Display objects from main, but that has not worked with what I want to do since in my header I already end up defining a new object.

Here is some example code of what I want to achieve (Please ignore simple compiler errors/This is just example code, and I am not going to post my entire project because that would be way to long/Ignore headers):

Main.cpp

 int main(){
    Display display;
    Job job;
    job.init();
    display.test();
    return 0;
}

Display.cpp

 void Display::test(){
     std::cout << "testing.." << std::endl;
 }

 void Display::test2(std::string ttt){
     Job job; //Do not want to create a whole new object here
     std::cout << "testing3333...." << job.getThree() << std::endl;
     std::cout << "testing2222...." <<  ttt << std::endl;
 }

Job.cpp

 void Job::init(){
      Display disp2; //I do not want to create a whole new object here, but I can't fix this
      disp2.test2("from Job");
 }

 std::string Job::getThree(){
       return "test3";
 }

Job.h

class Job{
private:
    Display disp; // Do not want a new object here as well
public:
    void init();
    std::string getThree();
};
share|improve this question
    
If you can't bother to write "example code" that compiles, why should we bother to give you an answer that works? –  Beta Mar 7 '12 at 0:01
1  
Then you would have to make six files, and that is a pain to do... –  user1062898 Mar 7 '12 at 0:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to pass a Job pointer to the Display, and vice versa, so they know about each other, eg:

Main:

#include "Display.h"
#include "Job.h"

int main()
{ 
    Display display; 
    Job job; 
    display.init(&job);
    job.init(&display); 
    display.test(); 
    return 0; 
} 

Display.h:

class Job;

class Display
{
private:
    Job *_job;
public:
    Display();
    void init(Job *job);
    void test();
    void test2(const std::string &ttt);
};

Display.cpp:

#include "Display.h"

Display::Display()
    : _job(NULL)
{
}

void Display::init(Job *job)
{
    _job = job;
}

void Display::test()
{ 
    std::cout << "testing.." << std::endl; 
} 

void Display::test2(const std::string &ttt)
{ 
    std::cout << "testing3333...." << _job->getThree() << std::endl; 
    std::cout << "testing2222...." << ttt << std::endl; 
} 

Job.h:

class Display;

class Job
{
private:
    Display *_display;
public:
    Job();
    void init(Display *display);
    std::string getThree();
};

Job.cpp:

#include "Job.h"

Job::Job()
    : _display(NULL)
{
}

void Job::init(Display *display)
{ 
    _display = display;
    _display->test2("from Job"); 
} 

std::string Job::getThree()
{ 
    return "test3"; 
} 

Given the requirements you mentioned, the Display does not really need to remember the Job, only the Job needs to remember the Display, so you could do something like this as an alternative:

Main:

#include "Display.h"
#include "Job.h"

int main()
{ 
    Display display; 
    Job job;
    job.init(&display); 
    display.test(); 
    return 0; 
} 

Display.h:

class Job;

class Display
{
public:
    void test();
    void test2(Job *job);
};

Display.cpp:

#include "Display.h"

void Display::test()
{ 
    std::cout << "testing.." << std::endl; 
} 

void Display::test2(Job *job)
{ 
    std::cout << "testing3333...." << job->getThree() << std::endl; 
} 

Job.h:

class Display;

class Job
{
private:
    Display *_display;
public:
    Job();
    void init(Display *display);
    std::string getThree();
};

Job.cpp:

#include "Job.h"

Job::Job()
    : _display(NULL)
{
}

void Job::init(Display *display)
{ 
    _display = display;
    _display->test2(this); 
} 

std::string Job::getThree()
{ 
    return "test3"; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked for what I wanted to achieve. Before you posted, I had tried to just initialize Display in the Job Class and created a Display getDisplay() method which main would call, but that did not work as I had planned. –  user1062898 Mar 7 '12 at 0:28

You seem to have a basic OOP problem at hand. Here's some questions that may lead you in the right direction.

How many instances of each class do you need for your program?

This depends on what problem you are trying to solve, so only you can give the proper answer.

  1. If you need exactly one instance of both classes, then make them singleton and both will have access to each other, by simply retrieving the singleton instance.

  2. If you need, say, one display instance and multiple job instances, you will want to store the Job instances in a container to which the one Display instance has access. You will want to make the Display a singleton so that it can be accessed at will.

  3. If you need several instances of both, then you will need to explicitly associate those which need to work together, by passing an already created object to the constructor of the other.

Think of this:

Display d1, d2;
Job j1(&d1), j2(&d2); // make sure not to copy the displays!

and in the Job constructor:

Job(Display *display): display(display) {
    display->setJob(this);
}

If there need to be multiple displays per job, you will have to replace the single display pointer in Job with a collection of Display pointers and manually add the appropriate displays to that collection.


If this doesn't help, you will need to explain to us what problem you are solving, and we may help further.

share|improve this answer
    
"If you need exactly one instance" is a bad reason to use singleton. A singleton is just another way to have a global variable and should be avoided for the same reason. If you only need one instance of a class then only make one instance, don't hard code that into the class. –  bames53 Mar 7 '12 at 0:21
    
In a very simple use-case, I would agree. But not knowing the OP's code and problem, how will he make sure he doesn't instantiate the object accidentally? As soon as you introduce a lazy-init factory function (friend of class or static member) for initializing the global variable, it's become a singleton pattern, more or less. –  Irfy Mar 7 '12 at 0:30
    
In more complicated cases it's even more important to avoid singletons, just like a global variable isn't so bad in a small program. In this case I think Remy Lebeau has it right: Make one Display at the top level, and pass the objects that need to know about each other around. –  bames53 Mar 7 '12 at 0:47

You need to learn about references and pointers in C++.

These are accesses to existing objects (think "a link to"). The main difference between the two is that there is that if you give a reference to an object, you guarantee that that object exists at the time you pass. If you give a pointer, there may be nothing behind it, this is referred as a "null" pointer (written NULL or nullptr) in recent versions.

Here is the main way to use both:

int i = 0;

int& refToI = i; // create a reference to i
int* ptrToI = &i; // create a pointer to i

int& anotherRef; // invalid, references must be initialized;
int* anotherPtr; // valid, points to garbage data, better set it to NULL though

refToI = 1; // i has been changed
*ptrToI = 1; // i has been changed, the "*" operator means "content pointed by"

Objects (or functions) accepting a reference or a pointer must clarify the lifetime they expect from the pointed objects. That is, once a reference or pointer is created, the object it points too may be destroyed. That's bad, avoid it.

Here are some examples in your case:

// Solution 1 take a reference to the objet in the function using it

class Job; // tells the compiler that there's a Job class somewhere.

class Display
{
public:
    void DoWork(Job& job) {
        // write this in the CPP file, I am using a shortcut for the sake of brevity
        job.DoSomething();
    }
};

// usage:
Display display;
Job job;
display.DoWork(job);



// Solution 2, carry the reference (or pointer) inside the class using it

class Job; // tells the compiler that there's a Job class somewhere.

class Display
{
public:
    Display(Job& job) // !! job must live at least as long as display
        : _job(job)
    { }

    void DoWork() {
        // write this in the CPP file, I am using a shortcut for the sake of brevity
        _job.DoSomething();
    }

private:
    Job& _job;
};


// Usage:
Job job;
Display display(job); // job and display have the same lifetime, OK
display.DoSomething();

NOTE

There's a debate on whether you should use pointers or references. I think this is a bit harder for you right now. A rule of thumb is use references when lifetimes are well known, use smart pointers when they're not or when using new.

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