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I realize session and REST don't exactly go hand in hand but is it not possible to access session state using the new Web API? HttpContext.Current.Session is always null.

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9 Answers

up vote 45 down vote accepted

I am currently using this solution in MVC4 and it works great:

WebApiConfig.cs

public static class WebApiConfig
{
    public static string UrlPrefix         { get { return "api"; } }
    public static string UrlPrefixRelative { get { return "~/api"; } }

    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "DefaultApi",
            routeTemplate: WebApiConfig.UrlPrefix + "/{controller}/{id}",
            defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );
    }
}

Global.asax.cs

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    ...

    protected void Application_PostAuthorizeRequest()
    {
        if (IsWebApiRequest())
        {
            HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior(SessionStateBehavior.Required);
        }
    }

    private bool IsWebApiRequest()
    {
        return HttpContext.Current.Request.AppRelativeCurrentExecutionFilePath.StartsWith(WebApiConfig.UrlPrefixRelative);
    }

}

This solution has the added bonus that we can fetch the base URL in javascript for making the AJAX calls:

_Layout.cshtml

<body>
    @RenderBody()

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var apiBaseUrl = '@Url.Content(ProjectNameSpace.WebApiConfig.UrlPrefixRelative)';
    </script>

    @RenderSection("scripts", required: false) 

and then within our Javascript files/code we can make our webapi calls that can access the session:

$.getJSON(apiBaseUrl + '/MyApi')
   .done(function (data) {
       alert('session data received: ' + data.whatever);
   })
);

Phew!

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I got the error in the template RIS does not exist. I'm an extreme n00b and didnt realize you should replace that with your project name, if anyone else runs into that –  Jameo Aug 29 '13 at 19:28
    
Sorry about that Jameo, I've updated it to say ProjectNameSpace so it should be a bit more obvious. –  LachlanB Aug 30 '13 at 1:47
    
Perfect. Simple and it works. For non-MVC, just add Application_PostAuthorizeRequest() to Global.ascx.cs. –  mhenry1384 Apr 10 at 19:12
    
Please see my answer below, it extends your solution to also send the session cookie as part of the response when a new session is created. I had to implement it because when using the WebApi the cookie was read but no request was sending initially back. –  JCallico Apr 29 at 20:52
    
Thanks @JCallico, I guess that most people hit the ASP.NET page first which creates the session. –  LachlanB May 2 at 0:05
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You can access session state using a custom RouteHandler.

// In global.asax
public class MvcApp : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        var route = routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "DefaultApi",
            routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
            defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
        );
        route.RouteHandler = new MyHttpControllerRouteHandler();
    }
}

// Create two new classes
public class MyHttpControllerHandler
    : HttpControllerHandler, IRequiresSessionState
{
    public MyHttpControllerHandler(RouteData routeData) : base(routeData)
    { }
}
public class MyHttpControllerRouteHandler : HttpControllerRouteHandler
{
    protected override IHttpHandler GetHttpHandler(
        RequestContext requestContext)
    {
        return new MyHttpControllerHandler(requestContext.RouteData);
    }
}

// Now Session is visible in your Web API
public class ValuesController : ApiController
{
    public string Get(string input)
    {
        var session = HttpContext.Current.Session;
        if (session != null)
        {
            if (session["Time"] == null)
                session["Time"] = DateTime.Now;
            return "Session Time: " + session["Time"] + input;
        }
        return "Session is not availabe" + input;
    }
}

Found here: http://techhasnoboundary.blogspot.com/2012/03/mvc-4-web-api-access-session.html

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This worked for me, thanks for sharing your find. Looks like the most simple way to do it too. –  rushonerok Mar 6 '13 at 16:08
    
This should be the real solution. –  NothingsImpossible Apr 29 '13 at 13:40
3  
Update: if your API functions read from session, and don't modify session, it might be a good idea to use IReadOnlySessionState instead of IRequiresSessionState. This ensures the session isn't locked during the processing of the API function. –  Warrick Hunter Jun 9 '13 at 20:48
2  
not working for me in MVC 4 - route.RouteHandler is not even a property for me. @LachlanB seems to have what worked for me. –  bkwdesign Aug 26 '13 at 19:15
2  
Thanks @bkwdesign for pointing out the MVC solution. This answer relates to Web API only. –  Warrick Hunter Aug 26 '13 at 23:55
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Well you're right, REST is stateless. If you use a session the processing will become stateful, subsequent requests will be able to use state (from a session).

In order for a session to be rehydrated, you'll need to supply a key to associate the state. In a normal asp.net application that key is supplied by using a cookie (cookie-sessions) or url parameter (cookieless sessions).

If you need a session forget rest, sessions are irrelevant in REST based designs. If you need a session for validation then use a token or authorise by IP addresses.

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5  
I'm not sure about this. In Microsoft's examples they show using the Authorize attribute. I've tried that and it works with Forms Based Authentication. The Web API is aware of the authentication state which is being passed in the default authentication cookie. –  Mark S. Mar 7 '12 at 1:18
1  
Here is the sample I'm referring to, code.msdn.microsoft.com/ASPNET-Web-API-JavaScript-d0d64dd7 . It uses the new REST based Web API implements Forms Authentication. –  Mark S. Mar 7 '12 at 1:24
3  
I've used the [Authorize] attribute successfully without needing session state. I just wrote an authentication message handler to set the identity. –  Antony Scott Mar 7 '12 at 23:34
1  
As @Filip said here: stackoverflow.com/a/11479021/538387 , let's do not follow this path (adding session to Web API which is supposed to be stateless). But the same Filip has a good article about Web API Caching: goo.gl/2rnfI I forked him in gitHub and add a few more functionality to the source code, now it supports separated output cache for logged-in users: goo.gl/oW4hX NOTE: I'm still improving the code and test it for any possible security breach. –  Tohid Dec 28 '12 at 15:29
27  
Marked you down because you didn't offer an answer to his problem, and more so, the Web Api is an asynchronous framework that works great with an ajax heavy web app. No one said you had to respect all tenents of RESTful design to gain benefits from using the Web API framework. –  Brian Ogden Apr 13 '13 at 16:48
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Mark, if you check the nerddinner MVC example the logic is pretty much the same.

You only need to retrieve the cookie and set it in the current session.

Global.asax.cs

public override void Init()
{
    this.AuthenticateRequest += new EventHandler(WebApiApplication_AuthenticateRequest);
    base.Init();
}

void WebApiApplication_AuthenticateRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    HttpCookie cookie = HttpContext.Current.Request.Cookies[FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName];
    FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = FormsAuthentication.Decrypt(cookie.Value);

    SampleIdentity id = new SampleIdentity(ticket);
    GenericPrincipal prin = new GenericPrincipal(id, null); 

    HttpContext.Current.User = prin;
}

enter code here

You'll have to define your "SampleIdentity" class, which you can borrow from the nerddinner project.

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2  
-> stackoverflow.com/a/9594406/324238 <- –  fampinheiro May 15 '12 at 21:05
    
The identity class is in NerdDinner_2.0\NerdDinner\Models\NerdIdentity.cs. –  mhenry1384 Apr 10 at 13:12
    
This doesn't work for me (in .NET 4). I never have that cookie. Does it only work if you have FormsAuthentication turned on? –  mhenry1384 Apr 10 at 18:54
    
the cookie does indeed get generated after you authenticate through the login form. You could also customise how/when it gets created, see stackoverflow.com/questions/7217105 But you still need the user to effectively authenticate against the web server –  JSancho Apr 10 at 23:00
    
The question asks for HttpContext.Current.Session and this answer does not clearly explains what needs to be done. See @LachlanB answer. –  JCallico Apr 29 at 20:50
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Last one is not working now, take this one, it worked for me.

in WebApiConfig.cs at App_Start

    public static string _WebApiExecutionPath = "api";

    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        var basicRouteTemplate = string.Format("{0}/{1}", _WebApiExecutionPath, "{controller}");

        // Controller Only
        // To handle routes like `/api/VTRouting`
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "ControllerOnly",
            routeTemplate: basicRouteTemplate//"{0}/{controller}"
        );

        // Controller with ID
        // To handle routes like `/api/VTRouting/1`
        config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
            name: "ControllerAndId",
            routeTemplate: string.Format ("{0}/{1}", basicRouteTemplate, "{id}"),
            defaults: null,
            constraints: new { id = @"^\d+$" } // Only integers 
        );

Global.asax

protected void Application_PostAuthorizeRequest()
{
  if (IsWebApiRequest())
  {
    HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior(SessionStateBehavior.Required);
  }
}

private static bool IsWebApiRequest()
{
  return HttpContext.Current.Request.AppRelativeCurrentExecutionFilePath.StartsWith(_WebApiExecutionPath);
}

fournd here: http://forums.asp.net/t/1773026.aspx/1

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This is the simplest solution but has a few mistakes in the code so that it doesn't actually work. I have posted another solution based on this one, feel free to edit yours to match mine. –  LachlanB Jul 9 '13 at 2:28
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Following on from LachlanB's answer, if your ApiController doesn't sit within a particular directory (like /api) you can instead test the request using RouteTable.Routes.GetRouteData, for example:

protected void Application_PostAuthorizeRequest()
    {
        // WebApi SessionState
        var routeData = RouteTable.Routes.GetRouteData(new HttpContextWrapper(HttpContext.Current));
        if (routeData != null && routeData.RouteHandler is HttpControllerRouteHandler)
            HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior(SessionStateBehavior.Required);
    }
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I had this same problem in asp.net mvc, I fixed it by putting this method in my base api controller that all my api controllers inherit from:

    /// <summary>
    /// Get the session from HttpContext.Current, if that is null try to get it from the Request properties.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    protected HttpContextWrapper GetHttpContextWrapper()
    {
      HttpContextWrapper httpContextWrapper = null;
      if (HttpContext.Current != null)
      {
        httpContextWrapper = new HttpContextWrapper(HttpContext.Current);
      }
      else if (Request.Properties.ContainsKey("MS_HttpContext"))
      {
        httpContextWrapper = (HttpContextWrapper)Request.Properties["MS_HttpContext"];
      }
      return httpContextWrapper;
    }

Then in your api call that you want to access the session you just do:

HttpContextWrapper httpContextWrapper = GetHttpContextWrapper();
var someVariableFromSession = httpContextWrapper.Session["SomeSessionValue"];

I also have this in my Global.asax.cs file like other people have posted, not sure if you still need it using the method above, but here it is just in case:

/// <summary>
/// The following method makes Session available.
/// </summary>
protected void Application_PostAuthorizeRequest()
{
  if (HttpContext.Current.Request.AppRelativeCurrentExecutionFilePath.StartsWith("~/api"))
  {
    HttpContext.Current.SetSessionStateBehavior(SessionStateBehavior.Required);
  }
}

You could also just make a custom filter attribute that you can stick on your api calls that you need session, then you can use session in your api call like you normally would via HttpContext.Current.Session["SomeValue"]:

  /// <summary>
  /// Filter that gets session context from request if HttpContext.Current is null.
  /// </summary>
  public class RequireSessionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
  {
    /// <summary>
    /// Runs before action
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="actionContext"></param>
    public override void OnActionExecuting(HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
      if (HttpContext.Current == null)
      {
        if (actionContext.Request.Properties.ContainsKey("MS_HttpContext"))
        {
          HttpContext.Current = ((HttpContextWrapper)actionContext.Request.Properties["MS_HttpContext"]).ApplicationInstance.Context;
        }
      }
    }
  }

Hope this helps.

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I followed @LachlanB approach and indeed the session was available when the session cookie was present on the request. The missing part is how the Session cookie is sent to the client the first time?

I created a HttpModule which not only enabling the HttpSessionState availability but also sends the cookie to the client when a new session is created.

public class WebApiSessionModule : IHttpModule
{
    private static readonly string SessionStateCookieName = "ASP.NET_SessionId";

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.PostAuthorizeRequest += this.OnPostAuthorizeRequest;
        context.PostRequestHandlerExecute += this.PostRequestHandlerExecute;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }

    protected virtual void OnPostAuthorizeRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpContext context = HttpContext.Current;

        if (this.IsWebApiRequest(context))
        {
            context.SetSessionStateBehavior(SessionStateBehavior.Required);
        }
    }

    protected virtual void PostRequestHandlerExecute(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HttpContext context = HttpContext.Current;

        if (this.IsWebApiRequest(context))
        {
            this.AddSessionCookieToResponseIfNeeded(context);
        }
    }

    protected virtual void AddSessionCookieToResponseIfNeeded(HttpContext context)
    {
        HttpSessionState session = context.Session;

        if (session == null)
        {
            // session not available
            return;
        }

        if (!session.IsNewSession)
        {
            // it's safe to assume that the cookie was
            // received as part of the request so there is
            // no need to set it
            return;
        }

        string cookieName = GetSessionCookieName();
        HttpCookie cookie = context.Response.Cookies[cookieName];
        if (cookie == null || cookie.Value != session.SessionID)
        {
            context.Response.Cookies.Remove(cookieName);
            context.Response.Cookies.Add(new HttpCookie(cookieName, session.SessionID));
        }
    }

    protected virtual string GetSessionCookieName()
    {
        var sessionStateSection = (SessionStateSection)ConfigurationManager.GetSection("system.web/sessionState");

        return sessionStateSection != null && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(sessionStateSection.CookieName) ? sessionStateSection.CookieName : SessionStateCookieName;
    }

    protected virtual bool IsWebApiRequest(HttpContext context)
    {
        string requestPath = context.Request.AppRelativeCurrentExecutionFilePath;

        if (requestPath == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return requestPath.StartsWith(WebApiConfig.UrlPrefixRelative, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
    }
}
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This was very handy for me - thanks :) –  Ian Yates Jul 2 at 6:17
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Going back to basics why not keep it simple and store the Session value in a hidden html value to pass to your API?

Controller

public ActionResult Index()
        {

            Session["Blah"] = 609;

            YourObject yourObject = new YourObject();
            yourObject.SessionValue = int.Parse(Session["Blah"].ToString());

            return View(yourObject);
        }

cshtml

@model YourObject

@{
    var sessionValue = Model.SessionValue;
}

<input type="hidden" value="@sessionValue" id="hBlah" />

Javascript

$(document).ready(function () {

    var sessionValue = $('#hBlah').val();

    alert(sessionValue);

    /* Now call your API with the session variable */}

}

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Waht if the application uses both MVC and WebAPI? Also, it is more reasonable some things to be stored at server side, e. g. Sharepoint security tokens. Instead of implementing a special wrapper for tokens storage like azure blobs container, sometimes is reasonable reuse Session for this type of data. The Sharepoint security context as it implemented in app template, uses the session to store these security contexts, and only small pieces of data being transfered (session tag) instead of few kilobytes of data. It would be awesome if these context would be smaller... –  Konstantin Isaev Mar 31 at 14:34
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