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In situations such as the one in the java snippet below, is it faster or better practice to surround the return false with an else block compared to having it just after the else block?

public boolean test(boolean var){
    if (var == true){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

compared to

public boolean test(boolean var){
    if (var == true){
        return true;
    }else{
        return false;
    }
}

Obviously this is an extremely simple example which can be shortened to one line, but my question is whether there is a jvm optimization which makes it more efficient to use the else block in the second snippet, or if it's better practice since both snippets are logically equivalent. So far, I have been using the first snippet simply because there's a little less code.

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Pick the one that's prettier. –  Mysticial Mar 7 '12 at 1:55
    
@Mysticial: Pick one that's prettier for you. Fixed it. :) –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 2:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I compiled both examples and the resulting bytecodes are identical:

  public boolean test(boolean var);
    0  iload_1 [var]
    1  ifeq 6
    4  iconst_1
    5  ireturn
    6  iconst_0
    7  ireturn
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 5]
        [pc: 4, line: 6]
        [pc: 6, line: 8]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 0, pc: 8] local: this index: 0 type: scratch.Else1
        [pc: 0, pc: 8] local: var index: 1 type: boolean

  public boolean test(boolean var);
    0  iload_1 [var]
    1  ifeq 6
    4  iconst_1
    5  ireturn
    6  iconst_0
    7  ireturn
      Line numbers:
        [pc: 0, line: 5]
        [pc: 4, line: 6]
        [pc: 6, line: 8]
      Local variable table:
        [pc: 0, pc: 8] local: this index: 0 type: scratch.Else2
        [pc: 0, pc: 8] local: var index: 1 type: boolean

As for which one you should use? In this contrived example, the answer is a resounding NEITHER. The best code that matches the behavior is this:

public boolean test(boolean var){
    return var;
}

Given the choices of "if { return } else { return }" vs. "if { return } return", my answer is usual the latter because I prefer less indentation. But I think it really depends on how much code is in each branch. More else code points to the latter, more if code points to the former.

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1  
+1 for exactness! –  smessing Mar 7 '12 at 2:02
2  
+ 1 Empirical answer. Now which one should you use? The one that makes more sense to you, or to others who will read the code. –  paislee Mar 7 '12 at 2:03
    
@paislee, edited to answer the "should" question –  Chris Dolan Mar 7 '12 at 2:12
1  
"The best code that matches this behavior.." replacing test(var) with var :) –  paislee Mar 7 '12 at 2:15
    
@paislee, the var code is harder to refactor later. :-) –  Chris Dolan Mar 7 '12 at 2:38

They are exactly the same. Ofen with little things like this modern compilers will optimize for you, javac does this. Consider the following class:

public class IsElseFaster {
    public boolean test1(boolean var) {
        if (var == true) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public boolean test2(boolean var) {
        if (var == true) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Copy and paste into your favorite editor, compile with javac. Then run javap -c IsElseFaster You'll get the following output:

public boolean test1(boolean);

  Code:
   0:   iload_1
   1:   iconst_1
   2:   if_icmpne   7
   5:   iconst_1
   6:   ireturn
   7:   iconst_0
   8:   ireturn

public boolean test2(boolean);
  Code:
   0:   iload_1
   1:   iconst_1
   2:   if_icmpne   7
   5:   iconst_1
   6:   ireturn
   7:   iconst_0
   8:   ireturn

As you can see the methods are exactly the same by the time you get to the .class file.

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This is very much a matter of personal style, and different people will give you different opinions; there's no one right answer. In terms of performance, it doesn't matter; the compiler will optimize them to be exactly the same (I just experimentally tested this).

Personally, I think the extra else is prettier. This might be my functional-programming background at work, though.

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In terms of the exact code snippets you gave:

  • The compiler will optimise the two versions to exactly the same bytecode, so there is no performance difference

  • In terms of style, there is no generally agreed rule. Some teams prefer to leave the else out as it is redundant, others prefer to include it as it is more representative of your intention. Personally I lean towards including the else as it catches accidental errors.

eg:

public Object foo(int i) {
  if(i > 0) {
     this.someMethod(); // !! Opps forgot to "return" here.
  }
  return this.anotherMethod(); // This method always returns 'anotherMethod'
}

(Edit: I had missed the final return from my first version, I guess that helps prove my point ;) )

If there was an else in there (else return this.anotherMethod()) then the compiler would give an error that the first branch never returns a value. So I find putting the else in place helps catch errors.

In the more general case (about whether to include an else or not), there will be situation where the compiler cannot optimise it as easily as in your simple example. In that case leaving out the else will produce less bytecode instructions, but whether that is faster or not will depend on the JVM, the JIT and the CPU you're running on.

These sorts of optimisations are very rarely worth worrying about - always go with which ever piece of code you (and your team mates) think is more readable + maintainable.

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Java doesn't return the return expression of the last statement (like, say, Oz or Pascal). Or maybe you meant to say that anotherMethod would always be called, not "returned". Eithe way, you're explanation is not very clear. –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 2:14
    
Sorry, I missed the return statement that was supposed to be there. I guess I just proved why I like to put the else in - I have a terrible tendency to fall victim to missing return statements. –  Tim Mar 7 '12 at 2:24
1  
Or you just proved that it might be better to organize your code to use a single return statement with different possible values, which produces the same "check" then (and makes it easier to trace) :) But that's another question and debate entirely... –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 2:28

First one is better because it is prettier even better if you could remove multiple exit points i.e. just one return or as little as possible and you can certainly do with one here.

Also please use codereview.stackexchange.com for review type questions.

public boolean test(boolean var){
    boolean flag;
    if (var == true){
        flag = true;
    }
    return flag;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: for "it is prettier". I agree with you, but nobody cares. (Remove that and I remove the -1 though.) –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 2:16
    
Happy for you to keep your vote to -1.First one is prettier because it does not make the reader have to read an else which has no reason to be there and adds to value. –  Shahzeb Mar 7 '12 at 2:52
1  
Again: I agree with you. But "it is prettier" is a subjective statement, it doesn't stand any ground. –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 3:00
    
@haylem do return statements sit on stack in JVM ? –  Shahzeb May 7 at 6:02

The first one is better because the else is not necessary. You never want to include unnecessary part in a design whether it is a java program or a car or something else.

UPDATE:

Necessity does not imply utilitarian in the common sense. If the superfluity is meant for defense in depth or aesthetics, for example, then it's not unnecessary. Understanding the posted question's example is simplistic, below is an example where the unnecessary else would complicate the design in that an additional return statement is required.

public static int add(int a, int b){
    if(a > 0){
        int c = a+b;
        return c;
    } else if( a<= 0){
        int c = a-(-b);
        return c;
    }
}

bty: while the example reduces the argument to absurdity, it illustrates the point of unnecessary parts.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd say there are lots of things where we add or "enhance" things where it's not necessary and not utilitarian, yet with (arguable and subjective) reasons. –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 2:17

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