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I have a family of complex functions performing very similar tasks except for one operator right in the middle of the function. A simplified version of my code could be something like that:

#include <assert.h>

static void memopXor(char * buffer1, char * buffer2, char * res, unsigned n){
    for (unsigned x = 0 ; x < n ; x++){
        res[x] = buffer1[x] ^ buffer2[x];
    }
};

static void memopPlus(char * buffer1, char * buffer2, char * res, unsigned n){
    for (unsigned x = 0 ; x < n ; x++){
        res[x] = buffer1[x] + buffer2[x];
    }
};

static void memopMul(char * buffer1, char * buffer2, char * res, unsigned n){
    for (unsigned x = 0 ; x < n ; x++){
        res[x] = buffer1[x] * buffer2[x];
    }
};


int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    char res1[5] = {};
    memopXor(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    assert(res1[0] == 0);
    assert(res1[1] == 0);
    assert(res1[2] == 0);
    assert(res1[3] == 0);
    assert(res1[4] == 1);

    char res2[5] = {};
    memopPlus(b1, b2, res2, 5);

    assert(res2[0] == 0);
    assert(res2[1] == 2);
    assert(res2[2] == 4);
    assert(res2[3] == 6);
    assert(res2[4] == 8);

    char res3[5] = {};
    memopMul(b1, b2, res3, 5);

    assert(res3[0] == 0);
    assert(res3[1] == 1);
    assert(res3[2] == 4);
    assert(res3[3] == 9);
    assert(res3[4] == 16);
}

It looks like a good case to use C++ templates to avoid duplicating code, hence I was looking for a way to change my code to something like below (pseudo code):

#include <assert.h>

template <FUNCTION>
void memop<FUNCTION>(char * buffer1, char * buffer2, char * res, size_t n){
    for (size_t x = 0 ; x < n ; x++){
        res[x] = FUNCTION(buffer1[x], buffer2[x]);
    }
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    char res1[5] = {};
    memop<operator^>(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    assert(res1[0] == 0);
    assert(res1[1] == 0);
    assert(res1[2] == 0);
    assert(res1[3] == 0);
    assert(res1[4] == 0);

    char res2[5] = {};
    memop<operator+>(b1, b2, res2, 5);

    assert(res2[0] == 0);
    assert(res2[1] == 2);
    assert(res2[2] == 4);
    assert(res2[3] == 6);
    assert(res2[4] == 8);

    char res3[5] = {};
    memop<operator*>(b1, b2, res3, 5);

    assert(res3[0] == 0);
    assert(res3[1] == 1);
    assert(res3[2] == 4);
    assert(res3[3] == 9);
    assert(res3[4] == 16);
}

The hard point is that I'm not willing to accept any slowdown of the resulting code. It means solutions implying indirect calls (either through vtable or function pointers) are not OK.

The common C++ solution to this problem seems to be wrapping the operator to call inside the operator() method of a functor class. Typically to get something like the code below:

#include <assert.h>

template <typename Op>
void memop(char * buffer1, char * buffer2, char * res, unsigned n){
    Op o;
    for (unsigned x = 0 ; x < n ; x++){
        res[x] = o(buffer1[x], buffer2[x]);
    }
};


struct Xor
{
    char operator()(char a, char b){
        return a ^ b;
    }
};

struct Plus
{
    char operator()(char a, char b){
        return a + b;
    }
};

struct Mul
{
    char operator()(char a, char b){
        return a * b;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    char res1[5] = {};
    memop<Xor>(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    assert(res1[0] == 0);
    assert(res1[1] == 0);
    assert(res1[2] == 0);
    assert(res1[3] == 0);
    assert(res1[4] == 0);

    char res2[5] = {};
    memop<Plus>(b1, b2, res2, 5);

    assert(res2[0] == 0);
    assert(res2[1] == 2);
    assert(res2[2] == 4);
    assert(res2[3] == 6);
    assert(res2[4] == 8);

    char res3[5] = {};
    memop<Mul>(b1, b2, res3, 5);

    assert(res3[0] == 0);
    assert(res3[1] == 1);
    assert(res3[2] == 4);
    assert(res3[3] == 9);
    assert(res3[4] == 16);
}

Is there any performance penalty to doing that ?

share|improve this question
3  
Only you can determine which is better in terms of performance by: 1. Profiling 2. Comparing & Analysing the generated assembly code. Both of these on your work environment. – Alok Save Mar 7 '12 at 3:45
    
The functor is probably going to get inlined anyway. – Etienne de Martel Mar 7 '12 at 3:47
1  
The compiler would probably have an easier time doing optimizations if you got rid of the local instance and made those actions static member functions. However the code either way can be optimized away(with a sufficiently advanced compiler). – Lalaland Mar 7 '12 at 3:48
    
@EthanSteinberg: As I demonstrated it does not really matter, as long as the functor call is inlined, removing the this parameter is a simple Dead Store Elimination. – Matthieu M. Mar 7 '12 at 13:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code you expose is about useless as far as bencharmk go.

char cversion() {
    char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    char res1[5] = {};
    memopXor(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    return res1[4];
}

char cppversion() {
    char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    char res1[5] = {};
    memop<Xor>(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    return res1[4];
}

Is compiled to such LLVM IR:

define signext i8 @cversion()() nounwind uwtable readnone {
  ret i8 0
}

define signext i8 @cppversion()() nounwind uwtable readnone {
  ret i8 0
}

That is, the compiler makes the whole computation during the compilation.

So I took the liberty of defining a new function:

void cppmemopXor(char * buffer1,
                 char * buffer2,
                 char * res,
                 unsigned n)
{
  memop<Xor>(buffer1, buffer2, res, n);
}

and removed the static qualifier on memopXor and then repeated the experience:

define void @memopXor(char*, char*, char*, unsigned int)(i8* nocapture %buffer1, i8* nocapture %buffer2, i8* nocapture %res, i32 %n) nounwind uwtable {
  %1 = icmp eq i32 %n, 0
  br i1 %1, label %._crit_edge, label %.lr.ph

.lr.ph:                                           ; preds = %.lr.ph, %0
  %indvars.iv = phi i64 [ %indvars.iv.next, %.lr.ph ], [ 0, %0 ]
  %2 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %buffer1, i64 %indvars.iv
  %3 = load i8* %2, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %4 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %buffer2, i64 %indvars.iv
  %5 = load i8* %4, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %6 = xor i8 %5, %3
  %7 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %res, i64 %indvars.iv
  store i8 %6, i8* %7, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %indvars.iv.next = add i64 %indvars.iv, 1
  %lftr.wideiv = trunc i64 %indvars.iv.next to i32
  %exitcond = icmp eq i32 %lftr.wideiv, %n
  br i1 %exitcond, label %._crit_edge, label %.lr.ph

._crit_edge:                                      ; preds = %.lr.ph, %0
  ret void
}

And the C++ version with templates:

define void @cppmemopXor(char*, char*, char*, unsigned int)(i8* nocapture %buffer1, i8* nocapture %buffer2, i8* nocapture %res, i32 %n) nounwind uwtable {
  %1 = icmp eq i32 %n, 0
  br i1 %1, label %_ZL5memopI3XorEvPcS1_S1_j.exit, label %.lr.ph.i

.lr.ph.i:                                         ; preds = %.lr.ph.i, %0
  %indvars.iv.i = phi i64 [ %indvars.iv.next.i, %.lr.ph.i ], [ 0, %0 ]
  %2 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %buffer1, i64 %indvars.iv.i
  %3 = load i8* %2, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %4 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %buffer2, i64 %indvars.iv.i
  %5 = load i8* %4, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %6 = xor i8 %5, %3
  %7 = getelementptr inbounds i8* %res, i64 %indvars.iv.i
  store i8 %6, i8* %7, align 1, !tbaa !0
  %indvars.iv.next.i = add i64 %indvars.iv.i, 1
  %lftr.wideiv = trunc i64 %indvars.iv.next.i to i32
  %exitcond = icmp eq i32 %lftr.wideiv, %n
  br i1 %exitcond, label %_ZL5memopI3XorEvPcS1_S1_j.exit, label %.lr.ph.i

_ZL5memopI3XorEvPcS1_S1_j.exit:                   ; preds = %.lr.ph.i, %0
  ret void
}

As expected, they are structurally identical as the functor code has been completely inlined (which is visible even without understanding the IR).

Note that this is not a result in isolation. For example, std::sort performs twice to thrice as fast as qsort because it uses a functor instead of an indirect function call. Of course, using a templated function and a functor means that each different instantiation will generate new code, as if you coded the function manually, but it is exactly what you were doing manually anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
obviously, the code I expose is indeed not benchmark code but unittest code and I'm expecting a good enough compiler will optimize all of it away if it can. – kriss Mar 7 '12 at 7:49
    
but OK, if I understand correctly what you say from assembly analysis my functor classes are simple enough to completely disappears when compiler inline code. – kriss Mar 7 '12 at 7:51

Only you can tell if something is fast enough for your needs. But I went ahead and ran your code on my own box to see what happens.

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
  char b1[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
  char b2[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

  int ans = 0;

  for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++) {
    char res1[5] = {};
    memopXor(b1, b2, res1, 5);
//    memop<Xor>(b1, b2, res1, 5);

    char res2[5] = {};
    memopPlus(b1, b2, res2, 5);
//    memop<Plus>(b1, b2, res2, 5);

    char res3[5] = {};
    memopMul(b1, b2, res3, 5);
//    memop<Mul>(b1, b2, res3, 5);

    ans += res1[0] + res2[1] + res3[2];  // prevents optimization
  }

  std::cout << ans << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

I compiled both versions with -O3 on g++. time returns 2.40s for the hand-coded version, and 2.58s for the template version.

(By the way, I had to correct your memopMul() to actually perform a multiplication.)

share|improve this answer
    
using Clang (and printf) I get, tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([3 x i8]* @.str, i64 0, i64 0), i32 600000000) nounwind. That is, the whole computation is done at compile time. Are you using a very old version of g++ ? – Matthieu M. Mar 7 '12 at 7:29
    
@MatthieuM. Yes, I have an ancient GCC at home. I was surprised that my compiler's template version was slower, though I suspect a more up-to-date compiler handles the optimizations correctly. – chrisaycock Mar 7 '12 at 13:51
    
Ah thanks, I understand better. Normally gcc and Clang are more or less on par, with Clang leading on numeric computations and gcc leading on more "regular" code (very high overview). – Matthieu M. Mar 7 '12 at 15:06

The only problem I could see with the above code, is the compiler will have trouble aliasing the memory operations when calling memop, see: C++ aliasing rules.

Remember also that in the template version, the compiler will generate a different object for each unique template argument passed in, which means for three calls to memop, with three different operations, you will get three implementations in the binary. This should result in code that is almost identical to your original code.

I agree with the other commenter's that the functions should get inlined. If the performance is critical though, you should benchmark your code before and after the proposed changes, just to be on the safe side, all it takes is the wrong compiler flag to blow things up.

share|improve this answer
    
there is indeed a memory aliasing issue with my sample code, but it exists both in templated and non templated code. I actually did some benchmark (on gcc) and results are as expected in answers. Without optimization the templated version is much slower, with O3 flag on there is no difference at all. Run time is identical and even generated assembly code is the exact same. – kriss Mar 7 '12 at 8:16
    
exactly as expected :) it is always good to confirm theory with observation! good stuff – fileoffset Mar 8 '12 at 4:41

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